Firm Promotes Sustainable, Equitable Design Through ‘Net-Positive Awards’

Hennebery Eddy’s second-annual Net-Positive Awards capped a month-long celebration of all things sustainability and honored internal teams for their achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive design. Project teams in design and construction were encouraged to share the story of how their designs are creating net-positive solutions responsive to clients, users, and the environment. A panel of five judges from among our staff had their work cut out for them. Ultimately, they selected the following projects, which represent the range of net-positive impacts achievable through our design process.

Rendered image by Hennebery Eddy Architects of PDX Terminal Balancing & Concourse E Extension, viewed from Airport Way

First Place: Net-Positive Project of the Year – PDX Concourse E Extension

This project (which garnered an honorable mention in last year’s awards program) is targeting completion next summer — and when complete, will offer a remarkable new passenger experience informed by resiliency, equity, and biophilia. The unique, column-free space with high, canted ceilings and a sweeping curtain wall will feature abundant daylight (lighting loads reduced 70%) and views of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. Durable, sustainably sourced, and locally produced materials are also designed to equitably serve a broad population. The project is on track for LEED Gold certification — no small feat for a facility that essentially operates 24/7.

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Hennebery Eddy Expands Design Team

Hennebery Eddy Architects has expanded its design team, welcoming two architects, a design staff member, and an interior designer.

Hennebery Eddy expands design team, welcoming Emily Green, Josh Stein, Danae Burck, and Jessy Miguel.

L-R: Emily Greene, AIA; Josh Stein, AIA; Danae Burck; Jessy Miguel

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Sherman County Courthouse Receives DeMuro Award for Preservation

preserving historic structures courthouse rehabilitation Hennebery Eddy Architects

Restore Oregon, the state’s leading organization committed to preserving historic structures, presented Hennebery Eddy with a 2019 DeMuro Award recognizing excellence in historic preservation. The firm’s rehabilitation and expansion of the historic Sherman County Courthouse in Moro, Ore., was honored during Restore Oregon’s annual Restoration Celebration on Nov. 1, 2019. The rehabilitation returned the landmark building to its original glory, including a new cupola that replicates the storm-damaged original. In addition, a thoughtfully designed annex complements the historic building and provides additional government and community services space.

The design team’s approach was fully rooted in historic preservation best practices. From the project’s inception, the team’s primary goal was that the new building complement the existing courthouse, granting it appropriate historic deference. This goal drove every aspect of the new building’s design, from location on the site and building height to material choices and window shapes. With more than double the square-footage of the original, the new building was carefully designed to minimize the impact of its mass and scale so as to not overwhelm the much smaller historic courthouse.

Additional images and information can be found on the project page.

Masonic Grand Lodge of Oregon Library & Museum Wins IIDA Award

Oregon library design by Hennebery Eddy Architects wins IIDA award

Hennebery Eddy’s design of the new Robert M. Richmond Memorial Library & Museum serving the Masonic Grand Lodge of Oregon received a Best in Category – Public & Civic award from the IIDA Oregon Chapter. Presented during the annual IIDA Oregon Design Excellence Awards celebration, the award recognizes the project’s timeless nature, as well as its simple, site-sourced materials palette. The IIDA is the International Interior Design Association.

The library and museum is a reading and research library and serves as a community and contemplation space for the Oregon Freemasons family. The library was dedicated and opened during a celebration this spring. Nestled among oak trees near Forest Grove, Ore., the new building features expansive glass walls and clerestory windows, and simple, geometric forms comprising wood salvaged from the site. More details and images can be found on the project page.

fire station design Hennebery Eddy Archtitects

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 Receives F.I.E.R.O. Award

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 received an Honor Design Award from the Fire Industry Education Resource Organization (F.I.E.R.O.) during the organization’s annual conference in Raleigh, North Carolina. The new fire station is one of two designed for the district by Hennebery Eddy that opened in the spring.

Hennebery Eddy project architect Camilla Cok, AIA, attended the F.I.E.R.O. conference to present “Equity, Efficiency, and Exceeding Expectations” with Clackamas Fire Deputy Chief Ryan Hari and Division Chief Josh Gehrke. The session provided an overview of the fire district’s goals of maximizing flexibility and efficiency to best serve the community, while creating a more equitable work environment. Camilla, Chief Hari, and Chief Gehrke shared Hennebery Eddy’s tailored, listening-first approach to designing Station 16. The collaborative effort resulted in an energy-efficient building with gender-neutral, space-saving bunk rooms; multi-use common spaces; optimized proximity between living quarters and the apparatus bay; and design features that acknowledge the historic significance of Oregon City and will also fit, reflect, and engage the community for the next 50 years.

Fire Station 16 is one of several award-winning fire station design projects from Hennebery Eddy. Other fire station projects include Clackamas Fire District Station 19, City of Portland Fire Station 28, and Fire Station 76 for Multnomah County Rural Fire Protection District 10.

Bend Science Station Receives Merit Award from AIA Northwest + Pacific Region

academic laboratory design Bend Science Station Hennebery Eddy Architects

A small building with a big impact was recognized with a regional design award by the AIA Northwest and Pacific Region. Bend Science Station Learning Laboratories, designed by Hennebery Eddy Architects, received a Merit award during Thursday’s regional award ceremony in Bozeman, Montana. The new 3,750-square-foot building is a light-flooded learning laboratory on the Oregon State University-Cascades (OSU) campus that provides access to state-of-the-art facilities for STEM education, research, and teacher training serving K-12 students and teachers of Central Oregon.

The Science Station fits the broader context of the high desert region and the immediate context of the new OSU-Cascades campus in form, materiality, and intent. A metal shell protects the warm, cedar-clad interior and covered outdoor spaces, and the building’s design fuses experiential learning and architecture, seen in the demonstration tower, outdoor classroom, and visible sustainable design features. Enrolled in the Path to Net Zero program through the Energy Trust of Oregon, Bend Science Station is one of the first buildings of its type in Central Oregon designed to achieve net-zero energy. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and native landscaping minimize on-site water use.

Additional project details and images can be found on the Bend Science Station project page in our Portfolio.

Principal in charge and Hennebery Eddy president Tim Eddy, FAIA, accepted the award with project manager and associate Dan Petrescu, AIA, and interior designer and associate Ashley Nored, NCIDQ. Tim also served as a member of the regional firm award jury following the AIA NW+PR’s recognition of Hennebery Eddy with the 2018 AIA Northwest & Pacific Region Firm Award. Congratulations to the 2019 Firm Award winner, Weinstein A+U, and to all of the design award recipients!

 

COTE Top Ten for Students Internship Focuses on Net-Positive Design

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern has shared their internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. This month, Philippe Bernard, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and graduate of Laval University, reflects on his time with the firm. Read previous posts by interns Haley here and Jordan here.

AIA COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard
COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard (left) meets with fellow staff members for input on their latest design.

This internship opportunity came at a pivotal moment in my development as a future architect. As a student, I participated in the AIA COTE Top Ten for Students 2019 contest, and our team was the first Canadian contestant to win this international competition! It was excellent news, considering that I was also completing my master’s degree at Laval University in Quebec City. It is thanks to this sustainable design competition that I was put in contact with Hennebery Eddy, an architectural firm also very committed to eco-friendly design. This is a very rewarding experience for me, given the important language adaptation that I have to demonstrate as a French-speaking Canadian. French is my mother tongue, so immersion in an English-speaking country and workplace is very instructive.

Prior to this internship in Portland, I had the chance to complete other work experience in various architectural firms in Quebec. The corporate scale of Hennebery Eddy is very interesting, combining the advantages of a large firm and the welcoming side of a smaller office. It is a firm with significant resources given its size of 65 employees, which offers a stimulating work environment. I really appreciate the attention of all the Hennebery Eddy staff in listening to my questions and comments. Everyone is treated equally, creating a very democratic and pleasant working environment.

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Staff Inspire High School Students Through Architecture Industry Mentorship

Architect Cara Wessel and interior designer Abby Cridland share about their experience volunteering with the ACE Mentor Program. The firm annually sponsors and enables staff to participate in this architecture industry mentorship as part of our Hennebery Eddy Gives program.

Cara (standing left) explains architectural design concepts to students during a mentor session in the Hennebery Eddy office.

Describe how the ACE program works.

Cara: ACE is an after-school program for high school students interested in Architecture, Construction and Engineering. Students are placed on teams and collaborate on a building design project under the mentorship of industry professionals from each of the three disciplines. Over the course of 12 meetings, the students learn about different phases of design through presentations, hands-on activities, and construction site visits. The mentors guide the students to complete their design project and present it at the end-of-year program.

Abby: These students are from all over the Portland metro area and are grouped together to create their own project. I even had a student who traveled from Jefferson County — that’s almost a three-hour drive! Each ACE session is hosted at a mentor’s office. This gives students a sense of not only how we work but were we work, helping make what they are learning more real.

What was your goal for the students in ACE?

Cara: I wanted to inspire the students and demonstrate the immense impact they can have on the built environment and the surrounding community.

Abby: My goal was to teach them about teamwork and communication: how it’s not up to a single person or discipline to make all of the decisions for a project, and all of the disciplines have to communicate for a project to be successful. I also wanted to teach the students there are multiple avenues in the ACE industry. I am the only interior designer in the ACE Mentor Program, so I show students how important it is to look at the interior of the building, the psychology of space, and different design principles to make building users comfortable.

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