Lessons Learned: Design-Build Trends & Best Practices Discussed at DBIA Event

In February, the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA) Oregon chapter hosted its first regional education event to encourage use of the delivery method and provide resources for the A/E/C/ industry throughout Oregon and Washington. Hennebery Eddy associate principal Jon McGrew serves as the Oregon chapter president and helped conceive of and organize the event along with Steve Tatge, president of the DBIA Western Washington chapter. A panel of experts discussed design-build trends, best practices, and positive experiences with the aim of advancing the conversation around design-build delivery. Below are takeaways from the event shared by Jon and Hennebery Eddy associate Nick Byers, who also sits on the DBIA Oregon board.

design-build trends discussed at an educational event
A packed room of owners, contractors, designers, and other A/E/C industry associates listen to a panel discuss design-build trends and best practices at the regional education event.

What was the goal of the conference?

Jon: We wanted to host a regional convocation of owners, builders, and designers interested in progressive design-build project procurement and delivery from across the Northwest. Sharing good information and experiences helps advance the conversation on best practices for progressive design-build. I always say the DBIA is the best professional social club in the region — you won’t find this blend of owners, builders, designers, and associated industry partners in any other organization.

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Make Others Successful: Hennebery Eddy Announces 2020 Promotions

Firm expands leadership team and promotes design, marketing and administrative personnel

 

L-R: Vice president & principal Michelle Vo; principals Andrew Smith, Kyle Womack, and Will Ives

The addition of three principals at Hennebery Eddy Architects brings its leadership team to eight, a move that supports the firm’s steady and significant increase in project scale and scope and number of employees. Architects Andrew Smith, AIA, Kyle Womack, AIA, and Will Ives, AIA, were named principals, recognizing their ongoing design and operational contributions. The firm also named principal Michelle Vo, AIA, a vice president of the firm, joining officers Timothy Eddy and Alan Osborne.

“Our firm has grown significantly over the past several years. Scaling up our leadership team accordingly is very important and will help us to continue to excel going forward,” said Hennebery Eddy Architects president Tim Eddy.

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Hennebery Eddy Architects COVID-19 Procedures

At Hennebery Eddy, we are committed to supporting the health of our staff, families, business partners, and the greater community. In response to public health guidelines surrounding COVID-19, we have implemented the following provisions to enable us to continue providing a high level of service to our clients in these evolving circumstances:

  1. Hennebery Eddy staff members are working remotely until further notice.
  2. During this time, all Hennebery Eddy-coordinated meetings will be conducted as phone/video conferences.
  3. Business air travel has been suspended for the next 30 days.
  4. If circumstances demand that in-person meetings must occur locally, we will be limiting the number of participants and following recommended social distancing practices.
  5. In-person construction site visits will be conducted to review issues that can’t be addressed digitally.

We will continue to monitor public health recommendations and evaluate modifications to these provisions as the situation evolves.

Hennebery Eddy is dedicated to our clients, the quality of our project work, our project teams, and each other. We take to heart the value of making others successful, regardless of where we are physically working. We remain accessible via email and phone and can be reached via our main line at 503.227.4860 and the direct lines or mobile numbers listed on our email footers and business cards. We hope this transition to remote work is seamless, and we thank you for your patience as we collectively navigate these dynamic times.

Please contact us with questions or if you require any assistance, and be well.

Hennebery Eddy Recognized for Sustainable Design & Historic Preservation Excellence

Firm named to Architect 50 second year in a row; historical architect named AIA Oregon Young Architect

The end of 2019 brought significant recognition for Hennebery Eddy. For the second year in a row, the firm was named to ARCHITECT Magazine’s Architect 50 – a listing of top firms in the nation. The ranking evaluates firms of all sizes across design, sustainability, and business practices. Our place on the list reflects our design approach and net-positive philosophy.

A significant component of sustainable design is historic preservation, and Hennebery Eddy’s Historic Resources Group brings specialty focus to this practice. The firm is proud to share that historical architect Carin Carlson was named the 2019 Young Architect by AIA Oregon in recognition of her commitment to cultivating and guiding current and future stewards, professionals, and advocates for historic resources through exemplary professional practice, leadership, mentoring and education.  Carin is a past Portland Historic Landmarks Commission member, and recently taught a course on building preservation plans at the University of Oregon.

adaptive reuse

Hennebery Eddy Designs Adaptive Reuse of 1911 Building into Hip KEX Hotel

At one of the most trafficked corners in Portland – the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and Couch, just past the Burnside bridgehead – sits a three-story, wood-framed structure with a brick exterior. The building has anchored this spot for more than 100 years, but only recently has it become a destination. With much fanfare, the KEX hotel opened here in November 2019, offering a unique experience that was many years in the making.

Hennebery Eddy designed the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of this historic building, which formerly housed The Vivian apartments, into a hostel with a ground-floor gastropub for the Icelandic brand KEX and local restaurant group ChefStable. Guest rooms on the second and third floors offer a variety of private and shared accommodations, while the open ground floor hosts casual dining and a constant stream of musical acts — a key focus of the KEX model. The hostel also features a courtyard with exterior seating and a stunning red neon sign, a rooftop bar and a community gathering room – Gym & Tonic – and conveniences for travelers like a sauna, shared kitchen and laundry rooms, and bike storage.

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PAM Rothko Pavilion Hennebery Eddy Architects Portland Oregon

Designing a Showpiece for Accessibility

Making the Portland Art Museum’s New Rothko Pavilion a Space for All Through Universal Design

The Portland Art Museum has long held accessibility at the core of its mission and offered a variety of services to assist visitors of all types. But the museum itself comprises two buildings, each with portions constructed in different eras and incrementally updated and expanded over several decades. Navigating the existing galleries across the various historic buildings has become increasingly problematic, and the need to create better connections has become a priority.

Hennebery Eddy, in partnership with Vinci Hamp Architects of Chicago, is designing the new Rothko Pavilion and campus renovations, which will connect the museum’s two existing buildings at every level, add 30,000 square feet of community and exhibition space, and establish a new, more accessible main entrance.

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Continuing Education Through an Interior Design Internship at Hennebery Eddy

By Jacqueline Tellez, Interior Design Intern

This fall, our studio welcomed recent-graduate Jacqueline for an interior design internship. Here she shares about her experience working with several project teams as part of our integrated approach to interior architecture. See the Opportunities page for more information about our internship program.

interior design internship at Hennebery Eddy Architects Portland Oregon
Interior design intern Jacqueline Tellez sorts through product samples in the materials library.

Q: What appealed to you about working at Hennebery Eddy?

A: What appealed the most to me about Hennebery Eddy was the kind of projects the firm focuses on. As a designer, I wanted to see how different firms take on different kinds of projects and understand what I would like to focus on (in my career).

Q: How is your internship related to your studies?

A: I graduated from the Art Institute of Portland in winter 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in interior design. During my internship, I’ve been able to have the experience to work on different kinds of projects, whether the tasks were small or big. It’s been a great experience as a designer to be able to dive deep into a project; in college, we don’t have that ability.

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Firm Promotes Sustainable, Equitable Design Through ‘Net-Positive Awards’

Hennebery Eddy’s second-annual Net-Positive Awards capped a month-long celebration of all things sustainability and honored internal teams for their achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive design. Project teams in design and construction were encouraged to share the story of how their designs are creating net-positive solutions responsive to clients, users, and the environment. A panel of five judges from among our staff had their work cut out for them. Ultimately, they selected the following projects, which represent the range of net-positive impacts achievable through our design process.

Rendered image by Hennebery Eddy Architects of PDX Terminal Balancing & Concourse E Extension, viewed from Airport Way

First Place: Net-Positive Project of the Year – PDX Concourse E Extension

This project (which garnered an honorable mention in last year’s awards program) is targeting completion next summer — and when complete, will offer a remarkable new passenger experience informed by resiliency, equity, and biophilia. The unique, column-free space with high, canted ceilings and a sweeping curtain wall will feature abundant daylight (lighting loads reduced 70%) and views of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. Durable, sustainably sourced, and locally produced materials are also designed to equitably serve a broad population. The project is on track for LEED Gold certification — no small feat for a facility that essentially operates 24/7.

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Hennebery Eddy Expands Design Team

Hennebery Eddy Architects has expanded its design team, welcoming two architects, a design staff member, and an interior designer.

Hennebery Eddy expands design team, welcoming Emily Green, Josh Stein, Danae Burck, and Jessy Miguel.

L-R: Emily Greene, AIA; Josh Stein, AIA; Danae Burck; Jessy Miguel

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Sherman County Courthouse Receives DeMuro Award for Preservation

preserving historic structures courthouse rehabilitation Hennebery Eddy Architects

Restore Oregon, the state’s leading organization committed to preserving historic structures, presented Hennebery Eddy with a 2019 DeMuro Award recognizing excellence in historic preservation. The firm’s rehabilitation and expansion of the historic Sherman County Courthouse in Moro, Ore., was honored during Restore Oregon’s annual Restoration Celebration on Nov. 1, 2019. The rehabilitation returned the landmark building to its original glory, including a new cupola that replicates the storm-damaged original. In addition, a thoughtfully designed annex complements the historic building and provides additional government and community services space.

The design team’s approach was fully rooted in historic preservation best practices. From the project’s inception, the team’s primary goal was that the new building complement the existing courthouse, granting it appropriate historic deference. This goal drove every aspect of the new building’s design, from location on the site and building height to material choices and window shapes. With more than double the square-footage of the original, the new building was carefully designed to minimize the impact of its mass and scale so as to not overwhelm the much smaller historic courthouse.

Additional images and information can be found on the project page.