Bend Science Station Receives Merit Award from AIA Northwest + Pacific Region

academic laboratory design Bend Science Station Hennebery Eddy Architects

A small building with a big impact was recognized with a regional design award by the AIA Northwest and Pacific Region. Bend Science Station Learning Laboratories, designed by Hennebery Eddy Architects, received a Merit award during Thursday’s regional award ceremony in Bozeman, Montana. The new 3,750-square-foot building is a light-flooded learning laboratory on the Oregon State University-Cascades (OSU) campus that provides access to state-of-the-art facilities for STEM education, research, and teacher training serving K-12 students and teachers of Central Oregon.

The Science Station fits the broader context of the high desert region and the immediate context of the new OSU-Cascades campus in form, materiality, and intent. A metal shell protects the warm, cedar-clad interior and covered outdoor spaces, and the building’s design fuses experiential learning and architecture, seen in the demonstration tower, outdoor classroom, and visible sustainable design features. Enrolled in the Path to Net Zero program through the Energy Trust of Oregon, Bend Science Station is one of the first buildings of its type in Central Oregon designed to achieve net-zero energy. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and native landscaping minimize on-site water use.

Additional project details and images can be found on the Bend Science Station project page in our Portfolio.

Principal in charge and Hennebery Eddy president Tim Eddy, FAIA, accepted the award with project manager and associate Dan Petrescu, AIA, and interior designer and associate Ashley Nored, NCIDQ. Tim also served as a member of the regional firm award jury following the AIA NW+PR’s recognition of Hennebery Eddy with the 2018 AIA Northwest & Pacific Region Firm Award. Congratulations to the 2019 Firm Award winner, Weinstein A+U, and to all of the design award recipients!

 

COTE Top Ten for Students Internship Focuses on Net-Positive Design

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern has shared their internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. This month, Philippe Bernard, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and graduate of Laval University, reflects on his time with the firm. Read previous posts by interns Haley here and Jordan here.

AIA COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard
COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard (left) meets with fellow staff members for input on their latest design.

This internship opportunity came at a pivotal moment in my development as a future architect. As a student, I participated in the AIA COTE Top Ten for Students 2019 contest, and our team was the first Canadian contestant to win this international competition! It was excellent news, considering that I was also completing my master’s degree at Laval University in Quebec City. It is thanks to this sustainable design competition that I was put in contact with Hennebery Eddy, an architectural firm also very committed to eco-friendly design. This is a very rewarding experience for me, given the important language adaptation that I have to demonstrate as a French-speaking Canadian. French is my mother tongue, so immersion in an English-speaking country and workplace is very instructive.

Prior to this internship in Portland, I had the chance to complete other work experience in various architectural firms in Quebec. The corporate scale of Hennebery Eddy is very interesting, combining the advantages of a large firm and the welcoming side of a smaller office. It is a firm with significant resources given its size of 65 employees, which offers a stimulating work environment. I really appreciate the attention of all the Hennebery Eddy staff in listening to my questions and comments. Everyone is treated equally, creating a very democratic and pleasant working environment.

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Staff Inspire High School Students Through Architecture Industry Mentorship

Architect Cara Wessel and interior designer Abby Cridland share about their experience volunteering with the ACE Mentor Program. The firm annually sponsors and enables staff to participate in this architecture industry mentorship as part of our Hennebery Eddy Gives program.

Cara (standing left) explains architectural design concepts to students during a mentor session in the Hennebery Eddy office.

Describe how the ACE program works.

Cara: ACE is an after-school program for high school students interested in Architecture, Construction and Engineering. Students are placed on teams and collaborate on a building design project under the mentorship of industry professionals from each of the three disciplines. Over the course of 12 meetings, the students learn about different phases of design through presentations, hands-on activities, and construction site visits. The mentors guide the students to complete their design project and present it at the end-of-year program.

Abby: These students are from all over the Portland metro area and are grouped together to create their own project. I even had a student who traveled from Jefferson County — that’s almost a three-hour drive! Each ACE session is hosted at a mentor’s office. This gives students a sense of not only how we work but were we work, helping make what they are learning more real.

What was your goal for the students in ACE?

Cara: I wanted to inspire the students and demonstrate the immense impact they can have on the built environment and the surrounding community.

Abby: My goal was to teach them about teamwork and communication: how it’s not up to a single person or discipline to make all of the decisions for a project, and all of the disciplines have to communicate for a project to be successful. I also wanted to teach the students there are multiple avenues in the ACE industry. I am the only interior designer in the ACE Mentor Program, so I show students how important it is to look at the interior of the building, the psychology of space, and different design principles to make building users comfortable.

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My Experience as an Intern at Hennebery Eddy

By Jordan Micham, Design Intern

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern will share their internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. This month, Jordan Micham, an undergraduate student at the University of Cincinnati, describes what he’s been up to during his time with the firm. Read the other posts in this series, by Haley here and Philippe here.

Intern at Hennebery Eddy, Jordan Micham, hiking with fellow interns
Hennebery Eddy interns and staff took a break from the office for a hike at Angel’s Rest; Jordan is on the far left.

I’ve always been drawn to the West. The dynamic terrain and variety of cultural influences made Portland an appealing destination for someone born and raised in the Midwest suburbs. Prior to starting work as an intern at Hennebery Eddy, I completed three other internships, ranging from small- to large-scale firms. Approaching my final year of my undergraduate studio, I wanted the opportunity to explore a mid-size firm in attempt to find a niche that was less corporate but still tackled more complex projects; Hennebery Eddy’s ensemble of around 65 people was the perfect scenario to do just that. The firm rests in the heart of one of the most vigorously design-oriented communities in America; Portland is a hub for creative innovation. My theme for this summer is to learn from the lifestyle of the anti-conformist creative.

In my studies at the University of Cincinnati, we’ve focused on the conceptual design process, primarily concentrating on human-spatial interaction. Getting involved in the design world through the internship program has helped me gain a better grasp on the industry and has informed my perspective on architecture more toward the concept of creating an engaging blend of form and function while designing within constraints. What they don’t teach you in the classroom is that few clients have the budget for your extreme designs. I’ve learned that architecture is often less about creating an evocative design but more about finding a way to translate the wants and needs of the client into a design that blends form and function while still satisfying the various building constraints.

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Lessons Learned: The Latest in Innovative Interior Design from NeoCon

By Jessy Miguel and Liz Bray, IIDA

Each year, Hennebery Eddy sends members of our interior design team to the NeoCon conference in Chicago, billed as “the world’s leading platform for the commercial design industry.” Jessy and Liz share what they saw at this year’s June show.

innovative interior designers at Hennebery Eddy Architects
Liz Bray and Jessy Miguel at the Chicago Skydeck during the 2019 NeoCon interior design conference.

It’s well established that beige cubicles are no longer best practice for workplace design. But the world of innovative interior design and planning is constantly progressing to promote experiences that are productive, flexible, and inspiring. Because of Hennebery Eddy’s commitment to net-positive spaces that are healthy, efficient, and adaptive, our interior design team is always keeping tabs on these advancements.

This year, NeoCon showcased a fresh perspective on contract furnishings. We were inspired by the integrity of materials, attention to detail, tactile experience, expressions of structure, and a lighthearted intelligence. The following trends stood out among manufacturers at the show.

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Architecture Internship Provides New Perspective for Design Student

By Haley Teske, Design Intern

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern will share their architecture internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. First, Haley Teske, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and student at Montana State University, reflects on her experience so far. Read the other posts in this series, by Jordan here and Philippe here

Haley Teske annotates drawings as part of her architecture internship
Student intern Haley Teske annotates a material palette study for the OSU Cordley Hall rehabilitation project.

My initial exposure to Hennebery Eddy began during my undergraduate experience at Montana State University. President Tim Eddy and Associate Dawn Carlton, both alumni of MSU, have been frequenting our school as active advisory council members for some years now and are highly regarded by the faculty.

Through studio critiques and my involvement with AIAS (American Institute of Architecture Students), I was quickly acquainted with both individuals and found them memorable due to a tangible authenticity. Fast-forward to graduate school, I stubbornly decided that I must work in Portland after deeming it one of the best design cities in the states. Hennebery Eddy immediately came to mind. Dawn was generous enough to give me a tour of the office, and I found the firm extremely appealing. Each design projected a distinct character to its history, site, and use as opposed to the ego of an architect. Rarely does a firm display attention to the needs of a project on such an apparent scale. If this firm listened so well to its clients, then it must listen as closely to the needs of its employees.

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Hennebery Eddy Hires Four Design & Marketing Staff

Hennebery Eddy Architects has expanded its design and marketing teams, adding a project architect, a design staff member, an interior designer, and a graphics coordinator.

Hennebery Eddy hires Portland Oregon
L-R: Andrew Milner; Nick Oelrich, AIA; Liz Bray, NCIDQ; Stephanie Van Dyke

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Oregon Freemasons Dedicate New Private Library

The Oregon Freemasons have existed for more than 150 years, headed by the Masonic Grand Lodge of Oregon. The fraternal order has its origins in the early skilled stone masons of the Middle Ages, who established “lodges” as a way to look out for their ranks. Today, Masons are not limited to skilled laborers, and their focus is primarily charitable giving. They also celebrate history, tradition, and literature — and have quite the collection of books and artifacts on their longtime Forest Grove campus.

And so the Grand Lodge of Oregon envisioned a new library and museum, open to the public and dedicated to the memory of Robert M. Richmond, a former Grand Master, and his love for books and pursuit of knowledge. This spring, the Oregon Freemasons cut the ribbon on this new facility designed by Hennebery Eddy.

The one-story building includes a conference room, a flexible event space, a museum display of various masonic artifacts, and a private library collection of more than 1,000 lineal feet. A brick façade leads to a daylit interior that hosted about 140 Masons and guests for the dedication. In the masonic tradition, members of the Grand Lodge performed a ceremony to verify the building is “plumb, square, and level” according to the tenants of their bricklayer predecessors.

See some snapshots of the grand opening below, and learn more about Hennebery Eddy’s library portfolio here.

Community Celebrates Ribbon Cutting at Two Clackamas Fire District Stations

Hennebery Eddy completes new Fire Stations 16 and 19 in Oregon City and Damascus, Oregon

Fire Station Architects Hennebery Eddy

Kids stared up in wonder at the shiny red fire engines, positioned in a striking “Z” shape that filled the 80-foot apparatus bay. The firefighters looked pretty excited, too, as they showed off their new digs to the more than 100 community members who gathered for the ribbon cuttings and open houses.

Other than the shift from a soaking-wet, gray winter day to a bright and breezy spring afternoon, the scene was similar for both events at Station 16 in Oregon City and Station 19 in Damascus. These two projects, funded by a Clackamas Fire District bond, represent a meaningful investment in each community and stand as a beacon of resilience and pride. Naturally, it was a time to celebrate.

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What I Learned from the Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship

Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray
Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray, left, works with design staff member Pooja Kashyap to capture project data for the DDx.

In 2019, Hennebery Eddy received a Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship grant from Energy Trust of Oregon to hire a sustainable design student intern to help us comply with our Architecture 2030 Commitment, integrate new sustainable design QC checks throughout our design process, and conduct post-occupancy evaluations focused on building performance. The internship demonstrates our dedication to the 2030 pledge and our broader net-positive philosophy and integrated sustainable design process. In the second post of a two-part series, intern Madelaine Murray shares her what she learned from her time at Hennebery Eddy. Read her first post here.

Purpose

The primary role of Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern for Hennebery Eddy is to help our sustainability committee report the firm’s 2018 projects performance metrics, using AIA’s Architecture 2030 Commitment tool called Design Data Exchange (DDx).

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