Hennebery Eddy Architects Announces New Hires and Promotion

New staff members strengthen firm’s sustainable design and BIM expertise

L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe
L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe

Hennebery Eddy Architects welcomed two staff members to the firm this summer, deepening its sustainable design, architectural and building information management (BIM) capabilities.

Samantha Bennett, AIA, joined the firm as a project architect, bringing high- and mid-rise multifamily housing, student housing, commercial, and mixed-used project experience, with specialized expertise as a Certified Passive House Consultant. She previously worked as an energy analyst, modeling energy savings and providing technical leadership and support for commercial energy efficiency projects. Sam applies a unique perspective on whole building design and sustainability to her Hennebery Eddy projects, which include rehabilitation of an historic dormitory in Mammoth, Wyo., and a new maintenance facility in the Lake Historic District in Yellowstone National Park. Sam is a LEED Green Associate and earned a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon.

Abby Short joined Hennebery Eddy as a member of the firm’s design staff, applying significant BIM knowledge to the Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension project. Abby specializes in coordinating design models and drawings and working with project teams on Revit implementation. She is a LEED accredited professional and earned a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from Ball State University and a Master of Architecture at Portland State University.

The firm also announces the promotion of Amber Nobe to marketing manager. Since joining Hennebery Eddy in 2016 as senior marketing coordinator, she has managed proposal and qualifications package development, marketing content and the marketing database, as well as the firm’s website. She is also a member of the firm’s sustainability committee, promoting a net-positive design approach. Amber has a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from Linfield College.

Lessons Learned: THERM and an Evolution of Wall Assemblies

By Mike Meade, AIA

Mike is a senior project architect with 18 years of experience and is a member of our in-house building enclosure committee, which provides envelope resources and technical support to our project teams. He sits on the board of the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently working on the PDX Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension project, discussed at the end of this post.

I attended a training from Passive House Canada on THERM software, which was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab for evaluating heat transfer through building components. Using THERM, you can model 2-D heat-transfer effects in components at building interfaces like windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors. Heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product’s energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity.

After the training, I was hungry to share the software and give our project teams a better way to evaluate details for thermal performance. I also thought about buildings I have built over my career. I’ve worked on buildings with many types of walls — some just to meet code, some just to meet the budget, and some to create the highest possible performance. I used THERM to evaluate these assemblies to see how we fared.

R-value measures the ability to prevent heat transfer. The higher the number, the better.

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PDX Runway Run 2016

 

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Architects by day, runners by night – it turns out we have some talented runners on staff who showcased their speed at the PDX Runway Run/Walk 6k. Hennebery Eddy was an event sponsor, and we had a blast joining over 1,600 participants cruising down the north runway at Portland International Airport in celebration of the Port of Portland’s 125th anniversary.

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Heidi Bertman, AIA, LEED AP, joins aviation and transportation design team at Hennebery Eddy Architects, Inc.

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Heidi will work on the Portland International Airport Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Expansion project

In a well-designed airport, travelers don’t have to squint to find their gate, cross their fingers for a nearby restroom, or backtrack for concessions they accidentally passed. The easy travel experience relies on special expertise in aviation architecture, and passengers visiting Portland International Airport will reap the benefits of Hennebery Eddy Architects’ latest hire. Heidi Bertman, AIA, LEED AP, has joined the practice, bringing more than 15 years of experience including a rich portfolio of design-forward aviation and transportation expertise. She’ll work on the Portland International Airport Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Expansion project.

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Autodesk A360 highlights PDX Terminal Balancing Project Team

The Port of Portland’s PDX Terminal Balancing project is being delivered as a collaborative design partnership between Hennebery Eddy Architects in Portland and Fentress Architects, headquartered in Denver, Colorado. Fentress and Hennebery Eddy work together as a single design team — enabled by A360 Team — to best utilize the strengths of both firms to deliver a complex public infrastructure project for the Portland International Airport.

 Read the full article on the Autodesk A360 Blog

PDX Carpet Redux

Amid the PDX carpet craze on social media, Hennebery Eddy Architects and Emerick Construction are hard at work removing the old carpet and installing the new carpet at the Portland International Airport. See for yourself, and watch the a timelapse of the PDX carpet replacement: