Firm Promotes Sustainable, Equitable Design Through ‘Net-Positive Awards’

Hennebery Eddy’s second-annual Net-Positive Awards capped a month-long celebration of all things sustainability and honored internal teams for their achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive design. Project teams in design and construction were encouraged to share the story of how their designs are creating net-positive solutions responsive to clients, users, and the environment. A panel of five judges from among our staff had their work cut out for them. Ultimately, they selected the following projects, which represent the range of net-positive impacts achievable through our design process.

Rendered image by Hennebery Eddy Architects of PDX Terminal Balancing & Concourse E Extension, viewed from Airport Way

First Place: Net-Positive Project of the Year – PDX Concourse E Extension

This project (which garnered an honorable mention in last year’s awards program) is targeting completion next summer — and when complete, will offer a remarkable new passenger experience informed by resiliency, equity, and biophilia. The unique, column-free space with high, canted ceilings and a sweeping curtain wall will feature abundant daylight (lighting loads reduced 70%) and views of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. Durable, sustainably sourced, and locally produced materials are also designed to equitably serve a broad population. The project is on track for LEED Gold certification — no small feat for a facility that essentially operates 24/7.

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Bend Science Station Receives Merit Award from AIA Northwest + Pacific Region

academic laboratory design Bend Science Station Hennebery Eddy Architects

A small building with a big impact was recognized with a regional design award by the AIA Northwest and Pacific Region. Bend Science Station Learning Laboratories, designed by Hennebery Eddy Architects, received a Merit award during Thursday’s regional award ceremony in Bozeman, Montana. The new 3,750-square-foot building is a light-flooded learning laboratory on the Oregon State University-Cascades (OSU) campus that provides access to state-of-the-art facilities for STEM education, research, and teacher training serving K-12 students and teachers of Central Oregon.

The Science Station fits the broader context of the high desert region and the immediate context of the new OSU-Cascades campus in form, materiality, and intent. A metal shell protects the warm, cedar-clad interior and covered outdoor spaces, and the building’s design fuses experiential learning and architecture, seen in the demonstration tower, outdoor classroom, and visible sustainable design features. Enrolled in the Path to Net Zero program through the Energy Trust of Oregon, Bend Science Station is one of the first buildings of its type in Central Oregon designed to achieve net-zero energy. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and native landscaping minimize on-site water use.

Additional project details and images can be found on the Bend Science Station project page in our Portfolio.

Principal in charge and Hennebery Eddy president Tim Eddy, FAIA, accepted the award with project manager and associate Dan Petrescu, AIA, and interior designer and associate Ashley Nored, NCIDQ. Tim also served as a member of the regional firm award jury following the AIA NW+PR’s recognition of Hennebery Eddy with the 2018 AIA Northwest & Pacific Region Firm Award. Congratulations to the 2019 Firm Award winner, Weinstein A+U, and to all of the design award recipients!

 

Building the Future of Historic Preservation: Teaching a Course on Building Preservation Plans

Nestled on a hilltop above Skyline Boulevard in Southwest Portland, the Aubrey Watzek House sits quietly, almost as a suspended moment of early modernism just minutes from downtown Portland. The Watzek House, designed by renowned Oregon architect John Yeon and built in 1937, is his masterpiece in wood and the precursor to Pacific Northwest Regional Modernism. The house is now owned by the University of Oregon’s College of Design.

This famous house has carefully articulated use guidelines — and designation as a National Historic Landmark and a local City of Portland landmark. But the house, like any aging structure, is showing its susceptibility to age and the Pacific Northwest elements. While a roof replacement is planned for the short term, the Watzek House requires a long-term preservation plan that takes a proactive approach to anticipating, planning for, and implementing maintenance and repairs that retain the historic building’s integrity. A comprehensive look at the building’s current condition, use, and its future is also long overdue. This need is the impetus behind a graduate-level historic preservation planning course taught by principal David Wark and associate Carin Carlson at the University of Oregon’s School of Architecture & Environment Historic Preservation Program.

A group of historic preservation planning students stand on the lawn outside of a the Aubrey Watzek House, an example of Pacific Northwest regional Modernism.
Students outside the Aubrey Watzek House in Portland, Ore.

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First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

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Hennebery Eddy’s First Community Service Scholarship

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy awarded its first Community Service Scholarship to associate Nick Byers, AIA, supporting his proposal to provide design services to a school with limited access to volunteer design professionals. The community service scholarship is part of the firm’s larger philanthropic effort, Hennebery Eddy Gives, which provides a framework for volunteering, financial contributions, and pro bono work to support community development where we work, live, and play. Here, Nick shares the process, successes, and lessons learned from his project.

Hennebery Eddy community development service project - Newly constructed raised planters at Clackamas River Elementary School
Newly constructed raised planters at Clackamas River Elementary School.

Please describe your service project. How did you conceive of it? 

In the summer of 2014, I volunteered with a group at an elementary school in Portland, where we assisted in improving a tired courtyard into a vibrant open space, complete with new landscaping, raised planters, and trees. The effort was led by a local construction company, and the final product was a beautiful new courtyard that gave the school a greater sense of pride and provided the opportunity to add gardening and healthy eating to its curriculum.  My fond memories of this project inspired my service project proposal for Hennebery Eddy’s community service scholarship.

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Restore Oregon’s DeMuro Award Honors Chapman Hall for Exceptional Historic Rehabilitation

Hennebery Eddy’s rehabilitation of the c.1939 Chapman Hall at the University of Oregon garnered a 2018 DeMuro Award from Restore Oregon, a nonprofit that advocates for preservation and reuse of historic structures. The DeMuro Awards honor extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects across Oregon, recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects.

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Campus Planning and Higher Education Design Expert Joins Hennebery Eddy

Associate principal Jane Barker, AIA, deepens firm’s experience in higher education and academic architecture, reinforces studio’s commitment to net-positive and sustainable design

Hennebery Eddy Architects associate principal Jane Barker, AIA, higher education design expert
Hennebery Eddy Architects associate principal Jane Barker, AIA

Students, staff, and faculty at colleges and universities throughout the Pacific Northwest and along the West Coast have benefited from architect Jane Barker’s campus planning and academic project leadership. The veteran higher education architect has designed more than 700,000 square feet of classroom, residential, and community spaces on more than a dozen college and university campuses. Now, Barker is bringing her experience to Hennebery Eddy as an associate principal, reinforcing the firm’s commitment to creating high-performance, energy-efficient, and award-winning learning spaces that inspire.

“Having worked as both an owner’s representative and as a design partner, Jane is uniquely qualified to anticipate and accommodate the priorities of our clients, while continuing to push the boundaries of design-forward, sustainable solutions,” said Tim Eddy, principal and president at Hennebery Eddy. “In addition, her leadership developing design and performance standards, including systems to achieve net-zero energy, water, and waste infrastructure, and her campus planning experience dovetail with the firm’s net-positive approach to design.”

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Designing for the Student User Experience: Hennebery Eddy Presents at SCUP

Two Hennebery Eddy teams presented in April at the 2018 Pacific Regional Conference of the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP), sharing takeaways from two recent academic projects, and offering participants actionable tools for their own campus planning projects.

Master Planning for Aspirational Outcomes: Rogue Community College Master Plan

A good campus master plan goes beyond infrastructure and site selection; it can impact the vision, strategy and growth trajectory of an educational institution. For Rogue Community College, Hennebery Eddy led a series of visioning workshops to plan for the future needs of the Table Rock Campus. On a compressed timeline, the team helped RCC articulate a project charter using integrated planning strategies. The team analyzed enrollment and classroom utilization data to make informed programming decisions, and conducted future vision planning, or “backcasting,” to identify a target future outcome, and work backwards to articulate the steps and processes needed to achieve that outcome.

Rogue Community College President Cathy Kemper-Pelle introduced the session, summarizing RCC’s main strategies for integrating industry partners and creating real-world work scenarios in the classroom. Gregg Sanders, associate principal and a leader in academic master planning and project management, then led SCUP session attendees through establishing a project charter, which can be used as a reference and touch point throughout the project decision-making process. He also conducted a backcasting exercise, which enables varying stakeholders to work beyond their current planning constraints and reconcile disparate goals with other decision-makers by working toward a shared vision. Interior designer Ashley Nored reviewed how the team gathered input from different user groups, accommodated RCC’s program priorities with student needs, and developed a phased plan for implementation.

Hennebery Eddy interior designer Ashley Nored chats with SCUP session attendees about the integrated master planning process.
Interior designer Ashley Nored chats with session attendees on how to make aspirational goals a reality through an integrated master planning process.

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Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus receives Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland

Hennebery Eddy is pleased to share that it has received an Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland for the design of Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus.

The project is pursuing both the Living Building Challenge Certification and Passive House Certification. These complementary certifications are based on actual performance and provide an organizational framework for tracking and ensuring the highest standard of design, detailing, construction, and operations. Upon completion, the project would be the first in a national park to achieve both certifications. The new Yellowstone Youth Campus is aspirational in seeking to set a new standard for design and sustainability within our national parks.

Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus daytime rendering of back of commons by Hennebery Eddy Architects
Rendering of the back of the commons building, one of 10 buildings on the campus of the Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus. Image copyright Hennebery Eddy Architects.

Beyond achieving the programmatic goals of growing youth programs, the campus will serve as both a teaching tool and a gateway to Yellowstone National Park for youth nationwide. The campus – comprising 10 buildings – will serve as the future home for multiple youth programs currently operating in Yellowstone. Inspired by the dramatic landscape and rich cultural history of the region, campus buildings reflect a contemporary expression of vernacular architecture of the West.

This award is one of a series of accolades Hennebery Eddy has received for its sustainable design work; it has received a AIA COTE Top Ten Award and three other 2030 Challenge design awards.

The 2017 AIA Portland Architecture Award is sponsored by BetterBricks.

Hennebery Eddy Architects President Timothy R. Eddy Elevated to College of Fellows by American Institute of Architects

Hennebery Eddy Architects is pleased to announce that firm President and Founding Principal Timothy R. Eddy has been elected to the AIA College of Fellows. Elevation to Fellow is the highest honor awarded by the American Institute of Architects and recognizes significant achievements of the individual and contributions to both the profession of architecture and society on a national level. Tim joins approximately 3 percent of AIA members who have earned this recognition. He will receive his Fellowship medal in April during the Investiture of Fellows Ceremony at the AIA Conference in Orlando.

Tim founded Hennebery Eddy Architects in 1992 with the late Stephen J. Hennebery. They envisioned a collaborative design firm with room for personal growth and expression. That founding spirit endures today: the firm has more than 50 staff members and has received more than 50 national, regional, and local design awards for its projects throughout Portland and the Pacific Northwest. In 2017, the firm celebrates its 25th anniversary.

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