Building the Future of Historic Preservation: Teaching a Course on Building Preservation Plans

Nestled on a hilltop above Skyline Boulevard in Southwest Portland, the Aubrey Watzek House sits quietly, almost as a suspended moment of early modernism just minutes from downtown Portland. The Watzek House, designed by renowned Oregon architect John Yeon and built in 1937, is his masterpiece in wood and the precursor to Pacific Northwest Regional Modernism. The house is now owned by the University of Oregon’s College of Design.

This famous house has carefully articulated use guidelines — and designation as a National Historic Landmark and a local City of Portland landmark. But the house, like any aging structure, is showing its susceptibility to age and the Pacific Northwest elements. While a roof replacement is planned for the short term, the Watzek House requires a long-term preservation plan that takes a proactive approach to anticipating, planning for, and implementing maintenance and repairs that retain the historic building’s integrity. A comprehensive look at the building’s current condition, use, and its future is also long overdue. This need is the impetus behind a graduate-level historic preservation planning course taught by principal David Wark and associate Carin Carlson at the University of Oregon’s School of Architecture & Environment Historic Preservation Program.

A group of historic preservation planning students stand on the lawn outside of a the Aubrey Watzek House, an example of Pacific Northwest regional Modernism.
Students outside the Aubrey Watzek House in Portland, Ore.

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Structural Steel Construction Complete at PDX Concourse E Extension

Milestone marks midway point for construction of the 148,000-square-foot Concourse E extension at Portland International Airport, anticipated to open mid-2020

Construction workers watch a steel beam being placed by a crane at Portland International Airport.
Part of #pdxnext, construction workers placed the last piece of structural steel on PDX’s Concourse E Extension. Photo courtesy of Jerry McCarthy, Port of Portland.

Construction workers placed the last piece of structural steel for the 148,000-square-foot expansion of Concourse E at Portland International Airport Thursday, Feb. 21. Part of the Port of Portland’s PDXNext program, a series of updates and upgrades to deliver a convenient, comfortable, uniquely PDX experience for travelers and employees now and into the future, the Concourse E expansion extends 830 feet east along the airport’s entry drive, adding six passenger gates and balancing the number of passengers using the north and south sides of the airport. The $215 million project began construction in 2017 and is on schedule to open mid-2020.

Poised as an impactful gateway to the airport, the Concourse E extension will create a memorable entry to PDX, named Best Domestic Airport by Travel + Leisure for the sixth consecutive year in 2018. The project also includes additional concessions, restrooms, support spaces, and amenities. Representatives from Portland International Airport, Skanska, Hennebery Eddy Architects, and Fentress Architects attended a topping-out ceremony, placing a signed beam to mark the occasion.

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Hennebery Eddy Architects Promotes Four

Firm names associate principal and three associates, recognizing exceptional project leadership and sustainable design advocacy

L-R: Patrick Boyle, AIA, Michael Meade, AIA, Ashley Nored, NCIDQ, Randall Rieks

Hennebery Eddy Architects is pleased to announce the promotion of four staff members. Patrick Boyle, AIA was promoted to associate principal, and Michael Meade, AIA, Ashley Nored, NCIDQ, and Randall Rieks were named associates. 

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First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

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Lessons Learned: THERM and an Evolution of Wall Assemblies

By Mike Meade, AIA

Mike is a senior project architect with 18 years of experience and is a member of our in-house building enclosure committee, which provides envelope resources and technical support to our project teams. He sits on the board of the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently working on the PDX Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension project, discussed at the end of this post.

I attended a training from Passive House Canada on THERM software, which was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab for evaluating heat transfer through building components. Using THERM, you can model 2-D heat-transfer effects in components at building interfaces like windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors. Heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product’s energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity.

After the training, I was hungry to share the software and give our project teams a better way to evaluate details for thermal performance. I also thought about buildings I have built over my career. I’ve worked on buildings with many types of walls — some just to meet code, some just to meet the budget, and some to create the highest possible performance. I used THERM to evaluate these assemblies to see how we fared.

R-value measures the ability to prevent heat transfer. The higher the number, the better.

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Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus receives Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland

Hennebery Eddy is pleased to share that it has received an Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland for the design of Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus.

The project is pursuing both the Living Building Challenge Certification and Passive House Certification. These complementary certifications are based on actual performance and provide an organizational framework for tracking and ensuring the highest standard of design, detailing, construction, and operations. Upon completion, the project would be the first in a national park to achieve both certifications. The new Yellowstone Youth Campus is aspirational in seeking to set a new standard for design and sustainability within our national parks.

Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus daytime rendering of back of commons by Hennebery Eddy Architects
Rendering of the back of the commons building, one of 10 buildings on the campus of the Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus. Image copyright Hennebery Eddy Architects.

Beyond achieving the programmatic goals of growing youth programs, the campus will serve as both a teaching tool and a gateway to Yellowstone National Park for youth nationwide. The campus – comprising 10 buildings – will serve as the future home for multiple youth programs currently operating in Yellowstone. Inspired by the dramatic landscape and rich cultural history of the region, campus buildings reflect a contemporary expression of vernacular architecture of the West.

This award is one of a series of accolades Hennebery Eddy has received for its sustainable design work; it has received a AIA COTE Top Ten Award and three other 2030 Challenge design awards.

The 2017 AIA Portland Architecture Award is sponsored by BetterBricks.