Firm Promotes Sustainable, Equitable Design Through ‘Net-Positive Awards’

Hennebery Eddy’s second-annual Net-Positive Awards capped a month-long celebration of all things sustainability and honored internal teams for their achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive design. Project teams in design and construction were encouraged to share the story of how their designs are creating net-positive solutions responsive to clients, users, and the environment. A panel of five judges from among our staff had their work cut out for them. Ultimately, they selected the following projects, which represent the range of net-positive impacts achievable through our design process.

Rendered image by Hennebery Eddy Architects of PDX Terminal Balancing & Concourse E Extension, viewed from Airport Way

First Place: Net-Positive Project of the Year – PDX Concourse E Extension

This project (which garnered an honorable mention in last year’s awards program) is targeting completion next summer — and when complete, will offer a remarkable new passenger experience informed by resiliency, equity, and biophilia. The unique, column-free space with high, canted ceilings and a sweeping curtain wall will feature abundant daylight (lighting loads reduced 70%) and views of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. Durable, sustainably sourced, and locally produced materials are also designed to equitably serve a broad population. The project is on track for LEED Gold certification — no small feat for a facility that essentially operates 24/7.

Read More.

Sherman County Courthouse Receives DeMuro Award for Preservation

preserving historic structures courthouse rehabilitation Hennebery Eddy Architects

Restore Oregon, the state’s leading organization committed to preserving historic structures, presented Hennebery Eddy with a 2019 DeMuro Award recognizing excellence in historic preservation. The firm’s rehabilitation and expansion of the historic Sherman County Courthouse in Moro, Ore., was honored during Restore Oregon’s annual Restoration Celebration on Nov. 1, 2019. The rehabilitation returned the landmark building to its original glory, including a new cupola that replicates the storm-damaged original. In addition, a thoughtfully designed annex complements the historic building and provides additional government and community services space.

The design team’s approach was fully rooted in historic preservation best practices. From the project’s inception, the team’s primary goal was that the new building complement the existing courthouse, granting it appropriate historic deference. This goal drove every aspect of the new building’s design, from location on the site and building height to material choices and window shapes. With more than double the square-footage of the original, the new building was carefully designed to minimize the impact of its mass and scale so as to not overwhelm the much smaller historic courthouse.

Additional images and information can be found on the project page.

fire station design Hennebery Eddy Archtitects

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 Receives F.I.E.R.O. Award

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 received an Honor Design Award from the Fire Industry Education Resource Organization (F.I.E.R.O.) during the organization’s annual conference in Raleigh, North Carolina. The new fire station is one of two designed for the district by Hennebery Eddy that opened in the spring.

Hennebery Eddy project architect Camilla Cok, AIA, attended the F.I.E.R.O. conference to present “Equity, Efficiency, and Exceeding Expectations” with Clackamas Fire Deputy Chief Ryan Hari and Division Chief Josh Gehrke. The session provided an overview of the fire district’s goals of maximizing flexibility and efficiency to best serve the community, while creating a more equitable work environment. Camilla, Chief Hari, and Chief Gehrke shared Hennebery Eddy’s tailored, listening-first approach to designing Station 16. The collaborative effort resulted in an energy-efficient building with gender-neutral, space-saving bunk rooms; multi-use common spaces; optimized proximity between living quarters and the apparatus bay; and design features that acknowledge the historic significance of Oregon City and will also fit, reflect, and engage the community for the next 50 years.

Fire Station 16 is one of several award-winning fire station design projects from Hennebery Eddy. Other fire station projects include Clackamas Fire District Station 19, City of Portland Fire Station 28, and Fire Station 76 for Multnomah County Rural Fire Protection District 10.

Community Celebrates Ribbon Cutting at Two Clackamas Fire District Stations

Hennebery Eddy completes new Fire Stations 16 and 19 in Oregon City and Damascus, Oregon

Kids stared up in wonder at the shiny red fire engines, positioned in a striking “Z” shape that filled the 80-foot apparatus bay. The firefighters looked pretty excited, too, as they showed off their new digs to the more than 100 community members who gathered for the ribbon cuttings and open houses.

Other than the shift from a soaking-wet, gray winter day to a bright and breezy spring afternoon, the scene was similar for both events at Station 16 in Oregon City and Station 19 in Damascus. These two projects, funded by a Clackamas Fire District bond, represent a meaningful investment in each community and stand as a beacon of resilience and pride. Naturally, it was a time to celebrate.

Read More.

First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

Read More.

Historic Preservation Internship at Hennebery Eddy

Hennebery Eddy hosted two interns this summer, both of whom are working on Master of Architecture degrees from the University of Oregon – Portland focused on historic preservation. In the second of this two-part series, Shannon Hines shares highlights from her historic preservation internship and takeaways from her time with the firm. Click here for Michael Moran’s experience.

Historic preservation intern Shannon visits the construction site for Clackamas Fire District Station 16 - not a historic project, but definitely part of a well-rounded Hennebery Eddy internship!
Shannon visits the construction site for Clackamas Fire District Station 16 – not a historic project, but definitely part of a well-rounded Hennebery Eddy internship!

Throughout school, I have had an interest in the historic preservation side of architecture and have taken both architecture and historic preservation classes at the University of Oregon – Portland. I first learned about Hennebery Eddy through one of my architecture studios when Tim Eddy came to talk with us about the Albina Vision effort the firm had been working on and learned more when Josette Katcha came into a historic preservation class to talk about her role as a specialist in the firm’s historic resources group. This was how I learned about Hennebery Eddy’s strong historic preservation expertise. This interested me because I would be able to combine my studies in a professional setting.

Read More.

Interning with Hennebery Eddy’s Historic Resources Group

Hennebery Eddy hosted two interns this summer, both of whom are working on Master of Architecture degrees from the University of Oregon – Portland focused on historic preservation. In this two-part series, Michael Moran and Shannon Hines share highlights from their historic preservation internship and takeaways from their time with the firm. Read on for Michael’s experience, and click here to read about Shannon’s internship.

Michael Moran, left, and Shannon Hines, far right, completed historic preservation internships this summer with the Historic Resources Group at Hennebery Eddy Architects.
Michael Moran, left, and Shannon Hines, far right, interned this summer with the Historic Resources Group at Hennebery Eddy Architects.

I was first introduced to Hennebery Eddy through my second studio at U of O in Portland. We adopted Hennebery Eddy’s Albina Vision urban design concept and focused on the design of a cultural building that would connect the Rose Quarter to the Willamette River by spanning a plaza over Interstate Avenue. The studio collaborated with the Portland Opera for the program. It was great to have Tim come in to present the urban vision, and to have such an aspirational framework to provide inspiration for our designs. I like the philosophy of the firm, especially the commitment to thinking about the long-term life of a building.

Read More.

Portland Art Museum Expansion Enhances Accessibility and Connection to City

Portland firm Hennebery Eddy Architects draws on local urban design, regulatory and historic preservation experience, collaborates with Chicago-based Vinci Hamp Architects for design of Rothko Pavilion

Sketch of one conceptual option for the Rothko Pavilion. The design supports the museum’s goals of new and enhanced art, program and public space.
Sketch of one conceptual option for the Rothko Pavilion.

The Portland Art Museum and its acclaimed collections will become more accessible to both visitors and passersby through the design of its new Rothko Pavilion. The pavilion, an addition announced in 2016, will connect the Museum’s existing Main and Mark buildings and add 30,000 square feet of community and exhibition space. The updated expansion design concept incorporates the existing Madison Street passageway between 10th and Park Avenues into a sheltered, public passageway with views into the community commons and Museum gallery spaces. Portland architecture firm Hennebery Eddy Architects is collaborating with Chicago-based Vinci Hamp Architects on the design; their work evolves the original 2015 concept to advance the museum’s goals of new and enhanced art, program and public space, and increased accessibility within and through the museum, as well as support Portland’s urban landscape.

“This expansion is an exciting opportunity to add and improve spaces for art and education as well as increase access to the renowned cultural treasures and programs of the Portland Art Museum,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director and Chief Curator of the Museum.

Read More.

Portland Art Museum selects Hennebery Eddy Architects as Architect of Record for museum renovation & expansion

The Portland Art Museum has selected Hennebery Eddy Architects as the Architect of Record for the museum’s renovation and expansion to provide enhanced access to the museum for people of all ages, including those with disabilities.

The project is currently in a due diligence, pre-design, and fundraising phase. Hennebery Eddy will collaborate with the Design Architect, Vinci Hamp Architects of Chicago, to develop the scope of work for the project and to refine design concepts first unveiled in 2015.

The art museum design concept articulates a connections-driven campus with the proposed new Rothko Pavilion at its center. More information can be found on the museum’s project website.

Hennebery Eddy Architects to Design New Bonneville Power Administration Fleet Services Building

Firm will draw upon its proven track record to deliver sustainable building design and safer industrial work site for agency’s new Ross Complex facility

Bonneville Power Administration employees at the utility’s Ross Complex are getting a safer, simpler, and more efficient workplace. The power utility that services more than seven states and 300,000 square miles across the Pacific Northwest has selected Hennebery Eddy Architects to lead a major facilities upgrade at its Ross Complex in Vancouver, Wash. When complete, the site will include distinct zones for heavy equipment, personal vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians, and a new 45,000-square-foot fleet services building with separate repair and administrative spaces.

Read More.