Designing for the Student User Experience: Hennebery Eddy Presents at SCUP

Two Hennebery Eddy teams presented in April at the 2018 Pacific Regional Conference of the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP), sharing takeaways from two recent academic projects, and offering participants actionable tools for their own campus planning projects.

Master Planning for Aspirational Outcomes: Rogue Community College Master Plan

A good campus master plan goes beyond infrastructure and site selection; it can impact the vision, strategy and growth trajectory of an educational institution. For Rogue Community College, Hennebery Eddy led a series of visioning workshops to plan for the future needs of the Table Rock Campus. On a compressed timeline, the team helped RCC articulate a project charter using integrated planning strategies. The team analyzed enrollment and classroom utilization data to make informed programming decisions, and conducted future vision planning, or “backcasting,” to identify a target future outcome, and work backwards to articulate the steps and processes needed to achieve that outcome.

Rogue Community College President Cathy Kemper-Pelle introduced the session, summarizing RCC’s main strategies for integrating industry partners and creating real-world work scenarios in the classroom. Gregg Sanders, associate principal and a leader in academic master planning and project management, then led SCUP session attendees through establishing a project charter, which can be used as a reference and touch point throughout the project decision-making process. He also conducted a backcasting exercise, which enables varying stakeholders to work beyond their current planning constraints and reconcile disparate goals with other decision-makers by working toward a shared vision. Interior designer Ashley Nored reviewed how the team gathered input from different user groups, accommodated RCC’s program priorities with student needs, and developed a phased plan for implementation.

Hennebery Eddy interior designer Ashley Nored chats with SCUP session attendees about the integrated master planning process.
Interior designer Ashley Nored chats with session attendees on how to make aspirational goals a reality through an integrated master planning process.

Read More

Restoring Community, Livability and Equity: Albina Vision

Throughout Portland’s history, the area now known as the Rose Quarter has seen significant transformation. These drastic changes, while beneficial to specific uses and groups, have often carried significant consequences, including decades of displacement – the uprooting of thousands of residents and small business owners, many of them Black or other minorities. Today, the Rose Quarter serves as an efficient events district, absorbing and releasing large surges of visitors. However, during non-event days and times, the district is vacant — an uninhabitable island within the city.

When Hennebery Eddy was invited to help develop a physical and economic vision for the district, we recognized the opportunity to use design to reflect the needs, goals and aspirations of a community, convey possibilities for integrating the district into the city, and incorporate the relationships and connections to nearby sites, prompting community conversation and input.

Rendering of plaza concept for Albina Vision urban planning effort in Portland, Oregon. Couple walking along open space with building on horizon.

Read More

Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus receives Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland

Hennebery Eddy is pleased to share that it has received an Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland for the design of Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus.

The project is pursuing both the Living Building Challenge Certification and Passive House Certification. These complementary certifications are based on actual performance and provide an organizational framework for tracking and ensuring the highest standard of design, detailing, construction, and operations. Upon completion, the project would be the first in a national park to achieve both certifications. The new Yellowstone Youth Campus is aspirational in seeking to set a new standard for design and sustainability within our national parks.

Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus daytime rendering of back of commons by Hennebery Eddy Architects
Rendering of the back of the commons building, one of 10 buildings on the campus of the Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus. Image copyright Hennebery Eddy Architects.

Beyond achieving the programmatic goals of growing youth programs, the campus will serve as both a teaching tool and a gateway to Yellowstone National Park for youth nationwide. The campus – comprising 10 buildings – will serve as the future home for multiple youth programs currently operating in Yellowstone. Inspired by the dramatic landscape and rich cultural history of the region, campus buildings reflect a contemporary expression of vernacular architecture of the West.

This award is one of a series of accolades Hennebery Eddy has received for its sustainable design work; it has received a AIA COTE Top Ten Award and three other 2030 Challenge design awards.

The 2017 AIA Portland Architecture Award is sponsored by BetterBricks.