Architecture Internship Provides New Perspective for Design Student

By Haley Teske, Design Intern

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern will share their architecture internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. First, Haley Teske, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and student at Montana State University, reflects on her experience so far.  

Haley Teske annotates drawings as part of her architecture internship
Student intern Haley Teske annotates a material palette study for the OSU Cordley Hall rehabilitation project.

My initial exposure to Hennebery Eddy began during my undergraduate experience at Montana State University. President Tim Eddy and Associate Dawn Carlton, both alumni of MSU, have been frequenting our school as active advisory council members for some years now and are highly regarded by the faculty.

Through studio critiques and my involvement with AIAS (American Institute of Architecture Students), I was quickly acquainted with both individuals and found them memorable due to a tangible authenticity. Fast-forward to graduate school, I stubbornly decided that I must work in Portland after deeming it one of the best design cities in the states. Hennebery Eddy immediately came to mind. Dawn was generous enough to give me a tour of the office, and I found the firm extremely appealing. Each design projected a distinct character to its history, site, and use as opposed to the ego of an architect. Rarely does a firm display attention to the needs of a project on such an apparent scale. If this firm listened so well to its clients, then it must listen as closely to the needs of its employees.

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What I Learned from the Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship

Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray
Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray, left, works with design staff member Pooja Kashyap to capture project data for the DDx.

In 2019, Hennebery Eddy received a Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship grant from Energy Trust of Oregon to hire a sustainable design student intern to help us comply with our Architecture 2030 Commitment, integrate new sustainable design QC checks throughout our design process, and conduct post-occupancy evaluations focused on building performance. The internship demonstrates our dedication to the 2030 pledge and our broader net-positive philosophy and integrated sustainable design process. In the second post of a two-part series, intern Madelaine Murray shares her what she learned from her time at Hennebery Eddy. Read her first post here.

Purpose

The primary role of Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern for Hennebery Eddy is to help our sustainability committee report the firm’s 2018 projects performance metrics, using AIA’s Architecture 2030 Commitment tool called Design Data Exchange (DDx).

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Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern: Introducing Madelaine

Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern Madelaine Murray working at Hennebery Eddy Architects. The NZEL internship is funded from a grant from Energy Trust of Oregon.
Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray consults with design staff and sustainability committee member Pooja Kashyap.

In 2019, Hennebery Eddy received a Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship grant from Energy Trust of Oregon to hire a sustainable design student intern to help us comply with our Architecture 2030 Commitment, integrate new sustainable design QC checks throughout our design process, and conduct post-occupancy evaluations focused on building performance. The internship demonstrates our dedication to the 2030 pledge and our broader net-positive philosophy and integrated sustainable design process. In the first of a series of blog posts, intern Madelaine Murray shares her initial reflections from the experience.

I’m Madelaine Murray, a graduate student in the College of Design at the University of Oregon – Portland. One of the advantages to studying in Portland is the ability to work at an architecture firm alongside classes, especially in a city acting as a hub for sustainable culture and mindful design. Hennebery Eddy is a very familiar name at the UO Portland, advocating for net-positive design, and several staff members have served as visiting reviewers for student projects. Hennebery Eddy is certainly a role model for successful projects rooted in context and for utilizing design principles relating to sustainability and thinking long term. University of Oregon encourages students to think beyond the buzzword of “sustainability,” allowing students to focus on many different avenues of design, such as adaptive reuse, resiliency, and energy efficiency. What was enticing about becoming a Net Zero Emerging Leader is advocating for these concepts beyond the academic realm. Reading about a building’s energy use in a textbook is not nearly as impactful as discussing it with a project team aiming reach a specific EUI goal. In a way, the NZEL program lets aspiring architects like me watch these sustainable design principles come to life.

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Lessons Learned: A week in the life of a Carleton College extern

By Karen Chen, Carlton College extern

Each year, the firm hosts an “extern” from Carleton College. These are undergraduate students who may be interested in pursuing design studies and architect careers, and their 1-2 weeks here are designed to give them a taste of every aspect of our profession. Our most recent extern, Karen Chen, shares reflections from her November externship. Her post has been slightly edited for brevity.

Karen Chen, right, with her externship homestay host at Portland’s Tilikum Crossing bridge.

I had the privilege and pleasure of being dipped into the professional sphere of architecture for a week at Hennebery Eddy Architects. During the externship application process, I was attracted to Hennebery Eddy’s demonstrated core values of innovative design, responsive service, and the obligation that firm members take ownership in their work. They aligned with my developing interests in art, STEM, and environmental and social justice — what would be more complementary than a discipline that uses considerations in aesthetics and physical function to create structures for people to inhabit in the real world?

I was exposed to an eye-opening, informative slice of the architectural industry and what professional life entailed. I gleaned a ton of knowledge and insight about architect careers simply through watching and talking with architects in various roles. Through shadowing, observing meetings, and conversations, I have a firmer handle on topics like entrance into the field, schooling, school-to-career transitions, internships, and career and job development. I both sat in on meetings about projects and accompanied architects who had volunteered to take me to tours of those project sites, including the Clackamas County fire stations, the new PDX terminal, a commercial renovation at Columbia Square, a factory cafeteria, and community college buildings.

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First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

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Hennebery Eddy Architects Hires Three

Firm welcomes new designers with sustainable design expertise

New designers at Hennebery Eddy, Erica Thompson, AIA, Kristin Erhardt, and Michael Scott
L-R: Erica Thompson, AIA, Kristin Erhardt, and Michael Scott

Hennebery Eddy Architects has hired three staff members with sustainable design experience, underscoring the firm’s commitment to net-positive and sustainable design solutions.

Erica Thompson, AIA, joined Hennebery Eddy as a project architect, bringing occupant health and wellness and energy efficiency expertise to her work on the renovation of the Columbia Square Building in downtown Portland. Erica has large-scale senior housing, office workspace, and transportation agency master planning experience. She also worked as an energy efficiency consultant, developing and implementing programs to advance energy-efficient products and technologies in the marketplace. Erica is a LEED Green Associate and a member of Hennebery Eddy’s sustainability committee, advancing the firm’s net-positive design process. She serves on the International Living Future Institute Portland Collaborative steering committee, advocating for sustainability at the local policy level. Erica earned a Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs from Lewis & Clark College and a Master of Architecture from the University of Oregon.

Kristin Erhardt joined the firm as a design staff member, applying a global sustainability perspective gained from living and studying in rural and urban settings around the world. A LEED Green Associate, she is working on a renovation of the Alaska Airlines lounge at Portland International Airport and the renovation of Cordley Hall at Oregon State University. Kristin earned a Bachelor of Design in Architecture from the University of Minnesota with a minor in sustainability studies and completed her Master of Architecture with a sustainable technologies focus at the University of Oregon.

Hennebery Eddy also hired Michael Scott as a member of its design staff. Michael takes a holistic, sustainable, community-oriented approach to his design work, drawing on his experience leading education and engagement initiatives for the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) California Central Coast Chapter. His project work at Hennebery Eddy includes an administrative building and a training center renovation, both for Clackamas Fire District No. 1. Michael earned his Bachelor of Architecture from California Polytechnic State University with a minor in sustainable environments. He is a LEED Green Associate.

Hennebery Eddy Architects Announces New Hires and Promotion

New staff members strengthen firm’s sustainable design and BIM expertise

L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe
L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe

Hennebery Eddy Architects welcomed two staff members to the firm this summer, deepening its sustainable design, architectural and building information management (BIM) capabilities.

Samantha Bennett, AIA, joined the firm as a project architect, bringing high- and mid-rise multifamily housing, student housing, commercial, and mixed-used project experience, with specialized expertise as a Certified Passive House Consultant. She previously worked as an energy analyst, modeling energy savings and providing technical leadership and support for commercial energy efficiency projects. Sam applies a unique perspective on whole building design and sustainability to her Hennebery Eddy projects, which include rehabilitation of an historic dormitory in Mammoth, Wyo., and a new maintenance facility in the Lake Historic District in Yellowstone National Park. Sam is a LEED Green Associate and earned a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon.

Abby Short joined Hennebery Eddy as a member of the firm’s design staff, applying significant BIM knowledge to the Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension project. Abby specializes in coordinating design models and drawings and working with project teams on Revit implementation. She is a LEED accredited professional and earned a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from Ball State University and a Master of Architecture at Portland State University.

The firm also announces the promotion of Amber Nobe to marketing manager. Since joining Hennebery Eddy in 2016 as senior marketing coordinator, she has managed proposal and qualifications package development, marketing content and the marketing database, as well as the firm’s website. She is also a member of the firm’s sustainability committee, promoting a net-positive design approach. Amber has a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from Linfield College.

Restore Oregon’s DeMuro Award Honors Chapman Hall for Exceptional Historic Rehabilitation

Hennebery Eddy’s rehabilitation of the c.1939 Chapman Hall at the University of Oregon garnered a 2018 DeMuro Award from Restore Oregon, a nonprofit that advocates for preservation and reuse of historic structures. The DeMuro Awards honor extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects across Oregon, recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects.

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Lessons Learned: THERM and an Evolution of Wall Assemblies

By Mike Meade, AIA

Mike is a senior project architect with 18 years of experience and is a member of our in-house building enclosure committee, which provides envelope resources and technical support to our project teams. He sits on the board of the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently working on the PDX Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension project, discussed at the end of this post.

I attended a training from Passive House Canada on THERM software, which was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab for evaluating heat transfer through building components. Using THERM, you can model 2-D heat-transfer effects in components at building interfaces like windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors. Heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product’s energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity.

After the training, I was hungry to share the software and give our project teams a better way to evaluate details for thermal performance. I also thought about buildings I have built over my career. I’ve worked on buildings with many types of walls — some just to meet code, some just to meet the budget, and some to create the highest possible performance. I used THERM to evaluate these assemblies to see how we fared.

R-value measures the ability to prevent heat transfer. The higher the number, the better.

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