A week in the life of a Carleton College extern

By Karen Chen, Carlton College extern

Each year, the firm hosts an “extern” from Carleton College. These are undergraduate students who may be interested in pursuing design studies and architect careers, and their 1-2 weeks here are designed to give them a taste of every aspect of our profession. Our most recent extern, Karen Chen, shares reflections from her November externship. Her post has been slightly edited for brevity.

Karen Chen, right, with her externship homestay host at Portland’s Tilikum Crossing bridge.

I had the privilege and pleasure of being dipped into the professional sphere of architecture for a week at Hennebery Eddy Architects. During the externship application process, I was attracted to Hennebery Eddy’s demonstrated core values of innovative design, responsive service, and the obligation that firm members take ownership in their work. They aligned with my developing interests in art, STEM, and environmental and social justice — what would be more complementary than a discipline that uses considerations in aesthetics and physical function to create structures for people to inhabit in the real world?

I was exposed to an eye-opening, informative slice of the architectural industry and what professional life entailed. I gleaned a ton of knowledge and insight about architect careers simply through watching and talking with architects in various roles. Through shadowing, observing meetings, and conversations, I have a firmer handle on topics like entrance into the field, schooling, school-to-career transitions, internships, and career and job development. I both sat in on meetings about projects and accompanied architects who had volunteered to take me to tours of those project sites, including the Clackamas County fire stations, the new PDX terminal, a commercial renovation at Columbia Square, a factory cafeteria, and community college buildings.

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First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

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Hennebery Eddy Architects Hires Three

Firm welcomes new designers with sustainable design expertise

New designers at Hennebery Eddy, Erica Thompson, AIA, Kristin Erhardt, and Michael Scott
L-R: Erica Thompson, AIA, Kristin Erhardt, and Michael Scott

Hennebery Eddy Architects has hired three staff members with sustainable design experience, underscoring the firm’s commitment to net-positive and sustainable design solutions.

Erica Thompson, AIA, joined Hennebery Eddy as a project architect, bringing occupant health and wellness and energy efficiency expertise to her work on the renovation of the Columbia Square Building in downtown Portland. Erica has large-scale senior housing, office workspace, and transportation agency master planning experience. She also worked as an energy efficiency consultant, developing and implementing programs to advance energy-efficient products and technologies in the marketplace. Erica is a LEED Green Associate and a member of Hennebery Eddy’s sustainability committee, advancing the firm’s net-positive design process. She serves on the International Living Future Institute Portland Collaborative steering committee, advocating for sustainability at the local policy level. Erica earned a Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs from Lewis & Clark College and a Master of Architecture from the University of Oregon.

Kristin Erhardt joined the firm as a design staff member, applying a global sustainability perspective gained from living and studying in rural and urban settings around the world. A LEED Green Associate, she is working on a renovation of the Alaska Airlines lounge at Portland International Airport and the renovation of Cordley Hall at Oregon State University. Kristin earned a Bachelor of Design in Architecture from the University of Minnesota with a minor in sustainability studies and completed her Master of Architecture with a sustainable technologies focus at the University of Oregon.

Hennebery Eddy also hired Michael Scott as a member of its design staff. Michael takes a holistic, sustainable, community-oriented approach to his design work, drawing on his experience leading education and engagement initiatives for the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) California Central Coast Chapter. His project work at Hennebery Eddy includes an administrative building and a training center renovation, both for Clackamas Fire District No. 1. Michael earned his Bachelor of Architecture from California Polytechnic State University with a minor in sustainable environments. He is a LEED Green Associate.

Hennebery Eddy Architects Announces New Hires and Promotion

New staff members strengthen firm’s sustainable design and BIM expertise

L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe
L-R: Sam Bennett, AIA, Abby Short, Amber Nobe

Hennebery Eddy Architects welcomed two staff members to the firm this summer, deepening its sustainable design, architectural and building information management (BIM) capabilities.

Samantha Bennett, AIA, joined the firm as a project architect, bringing high- and mid-rise multifamily housing, student housing, commercial, and mixed-used project experience, with specialized expertise as a Certified Passive House Consultant. She previously worked as an energy analyst, modeling energy savings and providing technical leadership and support for commercial energy efficiency projects. Sam applies a unique perspective on whole building design and sustainability to her Hennebery Eddy projects, which include rehabilitation of an historic dormitory in Mammoth, Wyo., and a new maintenance facility in the Lake Historic District in Yellowstone National Park. Sam is a LEED Green Associate and earned a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon.

Abby Short joined Hennebery Eddy as a member of the firm’s design staff, applying significant BIM knowledge to the Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension project. Abby specializes in coordinating design models and drawings and working with project teams on Revit implementation. She is a LEED accredited professional and earned a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from Ball State University and a Master of Architecture at Portland State University.

The firm also announces the promotion of Amber Nobe to marketing manager. Since joining Hennebery Eddy in 2016 as senior marketing coordinator, she has managed proposal and qualifications package development, marketing content and the marketing database, as well as the firm’s website. She is also a member of the firm’s sustainability committee, promoting a net-positive design approach. Amber has a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from Linfield College.

Restore Oregon’s DeMuro Award Honors Chapman Hall for Exceptional Historic Rehabilitation

Hennebery Eddy’s rehabilitation of the c.1939 Chapman Hall at the University of Oregon garnered a 2018 DeMuro Award from Restore Oregon, a nonprofit that advocates for preservation and reuse of historic structures. The DeMuro Awards honor extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects across Oregon, recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects.

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Lessons Learned: THERM and an Evolution of Wall Assemblies

By Mike Meade, AIA

Mike is a senior project architect with 18 years of experience and is a member of our in-house building enclosure committee, which provides envelope resources and technical support to our project teams. He sits on the board of the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently working on the PDX Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension project, discussed at the end of this post.

I attended a training from Passive House Canada on THERM software, which was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab for evaluating heat transfer through building components. Using THERM, you can model 2-D heat-transfer effects in components at building interfaces like windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors. Heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product’s energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity.

After the training, I was hungry to share the software and give our project teams a better way to evaluate details for thermal performance. I also thought about buildings I have built over my career. I’ve worked on buildings with many types of walls — some just to meet code, some just to meet the budget, and some to create the highest possible performance. I used THERM to evaluate these assemblies to see how we fared.

R-value measures the ability to prevent heat transfer. The higher the number, the better.

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Earth Day: Sharing Our Net-Positive Impact Stories

How can you be a positive force in the world? What can you do to improve your community, your project, your planet, or your life? This was the topic for Hennebery Eddy’s Earth Day celebration, a festive pin-up sharing our net-positive impact stories.

In our office work, we aspire to design net-positive spaces that reflect and respond to the natural environment and the people who use them. The result is a healthy, efficient, and adaptive net-positive outcome for clients, users, and the planet. In our pin-up, we reflected on that mission — and took it a step further, by looking at our personal net-positive experiences, too.

This topic has been on our minds as we wrap up participation in another inspiring EcoChallenge with the Northwest Earth Institute and Project Drawdown. From lessons learned on our design projects, to reflections on our connection to the natural world and tips we picked up from Drawdown’s research or our own, here’s what we shared.

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Social Responsibility: Promoting Equity Through ‘Just’ Transparency Label

When you buy packaged food at the grocery store, you can check the nutrition label to see what’s inside. Similarly, Hennebery Eddy design staff research Environmental and Health Product Declaration (EPD and HPD) labels to evaluate the life-cycle environmental impacts of the building materials and finishes we specify on our projects.

And now, anyone can see “what’s inside” the business of Hennebery Eddy through our JUST label.

Hennebery Eddy received a JUST label from the International Living Future Institute; see a full-size label here

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Community Service: Volunteering with Portland’s ReBuilding Center

Portland’s ReBuilding Center is a community development resource that uses building and remodeling materials to create positive outcomes in the Portland area.

As part of their DeConstruction program, crews glean reusable materials from demolition sites, salvaging about 85% of a building’s parts. These materials are taken to a re-processing lot, where volunteers remove nails, screws, staples, and the like.

The ReBuilding Center then uses this lumber in the construction of tiny homes for the houseless, as instruction material for their award-winning ReFind Education Program, or for re-sale in the ReBuilding Center’s public store at 40-90% off market value. It’s the triple bottom line of sustainability in action — environmental, economic, and social — and that’s the kind of community service we get behind.

As part of the firm’s annual Day of Service participation on Martin Luther King Day, our in-house Sustainability Committee organized a group volunteer shift at the processing lot. We liked it so much, we’re headed back on President’s Day for a second shift.

Hennebery Eddy pays for staff to volunteer up to 8 workday hours on MLK Day (or President’s Day) with an organization of their choice. Beyond our group activity, our staff also helped plant trees, weatherized homes for seniors, and lent a hand at local schools. These efforts are part of our net-positive philosophy in creating a better community around our business.