Lessons Learned: THERM and an Evolution of Wall Assemblies

By Mike Meade, AIA

Mike is a senior project architect with 18 years of experience and is a member of our in-house building enclosure committee, which provides envelope resources and technical support to our project teams. He sits on the board of the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently working on the PDX Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension project, discussed at the end of this post.

I attended a training from Passive House Canada on THERM software, which was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab for evaluating heat transfer through building components. Using THERM, you can model 2-D heat-transfer effects in components at building interfaces like windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors. Heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product’s energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity.

After the training, I was hungry to share the software and give our project teams a better way to evaluate details for thermal performance. I also thought about buildings I have built over my career. I’ve worked on buildings with many types of walls — some just to meet code, some just to meet the budget, and some to create the highest possible performance. I used THERM to evaluate these assemblies to see how we fared.

R-value measures the ability to prevent heat transfer. The higher the number, the better.

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Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus receives Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland

Hennebery Eddy is pleased to share that it has received an Architecture 2030 Award from AIA Portland for the design of Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus.

The project is pursuing both the Living Building Challenge Certification and Passive House Certification. These complementary certifications are based on actual performance and provide an organizational framework for tracking and ensuring the highest standard of design, detailing, construction, and operations. Upon completion, the project would be the first in a national park to achieve both certifications. The new Yellowstone Youth Campus is aspirational in seeking to set a new standard for design and sustainability within our national parks.

Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus daytime rendering of back of commons by Hennebery Eddy Architects
Rendering of the back of the commons building, one of 10 buildings on the campus of the Yellowstone National Park Youth Campus. Image copyright Hennebery Eddy Architects.

Beyond achieving the programmatic goals of growing youth programs, the campus will serve as both a teaching tool and a gateway to Yellowstone National Park for youth nationwide. The campus – comprising 10 buildings – will serve as the future home for multiple youth programs currently operating in Yellowstone. Inspired by the dramatic landscape and rich cultural history of the region, campus buildings reflect a contemporary expression of vernacular architecture of the West.

This award is one of a series of accolades Hennebery Eddy has received for its sustainable design work; it has received a AIA COTE Top Ten Award and three other 2030 Challenge design awards.

The 2017 AIA Portland Architecture Award is sponsored by BetterBricks.

Hennebery Eddy Architects to Design Clackamas Fire Station 16

Clackamas Fire Station 16 fire station architect Hennebery Eddy
Hennebery Eddy Architects Rendering

Firefighters serving the Hilltop area of Oregon City will have a new fire station to call home in mid-2018. Clackamas Fire District #1 has selected Hennebery Eddy Architects, Inc., to design the new Fire Station 16, which will replace the existing 1970s facility on the same site. Currently in the design phase, the new Fire Station 16 will house up to eight fire fighters and the battalion chief, and will include a larger apparatus bay to house a new ladder truck. The 12,000-square-foot critical facility will also support district training activities.

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Hennebery Eddy Architects Promotes Three, Recognizes Associate for Passive House Certification

Promo 2 Grid
Left to Right: Meg, Andrew, Carin, Will

Experience and expertise are deepening at Hennebery Eddy Architects with the promotion of three staff members and professional certification of a fourth. Meg Matsushima, AIA, and Andrew Smith, AIA, were promoted to associate principal, and Carin Carlson, AIA, was promoted to associate. In addition, associate Will Ives, AIA, is now a Certified Passive House Consultant.

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