First Annual ‘Net-Positive Awards’ Recognize Sustainable Design Excellence

net-positive energy design awards Hennebery Eddy Architects

In 2018, Hennebery Eddy placed No. 31 on the Architect 50 – a ranking of the top 50 firms in the country – bolstered by our strong showing in the sustainable design category. Our net-positive philosophy and design approach landed us at No. 11 in that category.

We aspire to design net-positive solutions through healthy, efficient, and adaptive spaces that are responsive to our clients, the environment, and the people who use them.

To recognize our project teams’ achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive (HEA) design, 2018 also saw us launch an “HEA Net-Positive Awards” program for projects that recently completed design or construction. The 12 entries ranged in size, market, and style and featured net-positive stories that included innovations in daylighting, careful use of mindful materials, historic preservation, and impressive energy use reduction. A panel of five judges from among our staff honored the following projects.

Read More.

Restore Oregon’s DeMuro Award Honors Chapman Hall for Exceptional Historic Rehabilitation

Hennebery Eddy’s rehabilitation of the c.1939 Chapman Hall at the University of Oregon garnered a 2018 DeMuro Award from Restore Oregon, a nonprofit that advocates for preservation and reuse of historic structures. The DeMuro Awards honor extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects across Oregon, recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects.

Read More.

Portland Art Museum Expansion Enhances Accessibility and Connection to City

Portland firm Hennebery Eddy Architects draws on local urban design, regulatory and historic preservation experience, collaborates with Chicago-based Vinci Hamp Architects for design of Rothko Pavilion

Sketch of one conceptual option for the Rothko Pavilion. The design supports the museum’s goals of new and enhanced art, program and public space.
Sketch of one conceptual option for the Rothko Pavilion.

The Portland Art Museum and its acclaimed collections will become more accessible to both visitors and passersby through the design of its new Rothko Pavilion. The pavilion, an addition announced in 2016, will connect the Museum’s existing Main and Mark buildings and add 30,000 square feet of community and exhibition space. The updated expansion design concept incorporates the existing Madison Street passageway between 10th and Park Avenues into a sheltered, public passageway with views into the community commons and Museum gallery spaces. Portland architecture firm Hennebery Eddy Architects is collaborating with Chicago-based Vinci Hamp Architects on the design; their work evolves the original 2015 concept to advance the museum’s goals of new and enhanced art, program and public space, and increased accessibility within and through the museum, as well as support Portland’s urban landscape.

“This expansion is an exciting opportunity to add and improve spaces for art and education as well as increase access to the renowned cultural treasures and programs of the Portland Art Museum,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director and Chief Curator of the Museum.

Read More.

Portland’s Proposed URM Mandate and Historic Rehabilitation: What Building Owners Can Do Now

Regardless of whether the City of Portland adopts a mandate requiring the seismic retrofit of unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings, the realities of a probable major seismic event in the next 50 years are sobering — with life-altering, social, financial and economic implications for everyone in the region. For many building owners, a retrofit requirement may seem financially infeasible if they lack the liquidity to pay for potential retrofits and cannot secure funding from risk-averse lenders. Though it may be months or even years before the city finalizes or implements a mandate, building owners can and should start evaluating now the potential costs of seismic retrofits to protect life and property — and whether federal, state or other grant money may be applied to offset these costs.

The Vivian Apartments, historically known as the Alco Apartments, constructed in 1912 and located in NE Portland. As part of a larger renovation effort, which includes seismic reinforcement of the URM structure, Hennebery Eddy is completing Federal Tax Credit and State of Oregon Special Assessment applications for the property. Hennebery Eddy helped list the property on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. Image courtesy of the Oregon Historical Society.

Read More.

Designing for the Student User Experience: Hennebery Eddy Presents at SCUP

Two Hennebery Eddy teams presented in April at the 2018 Pacific Regional Conference of the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP), sharing takeaways from two recent academic projects, and offering participants actionable tools for their own campus planning projects.

Master Planning for Aspirational Outcomes: Rogue Community College Master Plan

A good campus master plan goes beyond infrastructure and site selection; it can impact the vision, strategy and growth trajectory of an educational institution. For Rogue Community College, Hennebery Eddy led a series of visioning workshops to plan for the future needs of the Table Rock Campus. On a compressed timeline, the team helped RCC articulate a project charter using integrated planning strategies. The team analyzed enrollment and classroom utilization data to make informed programming decisions, and conducted future vision planning, or “backcasting,” to identify a target future outcome, and work backwards to articulate the steps and processes needed to achieve that outcome.

Rogue Community College President Cathy Kemper-Pelle introduced the session, summarizing RCC’s main strategies for integrating industry partners and creating real-world work scenarios in the classroom. Gregg Sanders, associate principal and a leader in academic master planning and project management, then led SCUP session attendees through establishing a project charter, which can be used as a reference and touch point throughout the project decision-making process. He also conducted a backcasting exercise, which enables varying stakeholders to work beyond their current planning constraints and reconcile disparate goals with other decision-makers by working toward a shared vision. Interior designer Ashley Nored reviewed how the team gathered input from different user groups, accommodated RCC’s program priorities with student needs, and developed a phased plan for implementation.

Hennebery Eddy interior designer Ashley Nored chats with SCUP session attendees about the integrated master planning process.
Interior designer Ashley Nored chats with session attendees on how to make aspirational goals a reality through an integrated master planning process.

Read More.

Portland Art Museum selects Hennebery Eddy Architects as Architect of Record for museum renovation & expansion

The Portland Art Museum has selected Hennebery Eddy Architects as the Architect of Record for the museum’s renovation and expansion to provide enhanced access to the museum for people of all ages, including those with disabilities.

The project is currently in a due diligence, pre-design, and fundraising phase. Hennebery Eddy will collaborate with the Design Architect, Vinci Hamp Architects of Chicago, to develop the scope of work for the project and to refine design concepts first unveiled in 2015.

The art museum design concept articulates a connections-driven campus with the proposed new Rothko Pavilion at its center. More information can be found on the museum’s project website.

Principal David E. Wark Elevated to AIA College of Fellows

Historical architect, urban design advocate recognized for historic preservation achievements and contributions to profession and society

Compilation of architecture projects led by David Wark
L-R: Kenton Library; Astoria Column stair replacement; The Reserve; OSU Strand Agriculture Hall; David E. Wark, FAIA

Hennebery Eddy Architects, Inc., is pleased to announce that Principal David E. Wark has been elected to the AIA College of Fellows. Elevation to Fellow is the highest honor awarded by the AIA and recognizes significant achievements of the individual and contributions to both the profession of architecture and society on a national level. David joins approximately 3 percent of AIA members who have earned this recognition.

Throughout his 40-year career, David has successfully resolved the inherent tension between maintaining the integrity of historic places and the necessity of accommodating change. His preservation efforts have resulted in renewed opportunities for education, a revival in recreation activities, and revitalized neighborhoods via the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of historic properties. David’s design approach has benefitted public libraries, colleges and universities, and national park properties; in his role as a City of Portland Design Commissioner and chairperson, he influenced hundreds of urban design and development efforts.

Read More.

Hennebery Eddy helps TriMet update Blue Line MAX facilities, starting with Gresham City Hall station

Hennebery Eddy is working with CH2M providing transportation architecture services as part of the upgrades to facilities along the TriMet MAX Blue Line, Portland’s light rail line system that has been in operation for more than 30 years. Along with conducting studies to incorporate a new faregate system, we also developed a “menu” of improvement options for the platform components, including shelter roofs, platform buildings, art glass wind screens, stairways, railings, paving, signage, and lighting.

TriMet Blue MAX Line Gresham City Hall Station transportation architecture

photo courtesy of TriMet

The Gresham City Hall station was the first on the Blue Line to be completed and opened this summer. It includes a clear fare zone, improves safety and visibility, and reflects standardization in components, signs, amenities, and finishes that are also low-maintenance and durable. For a closer look at the new station, hop over to the TriMet blog, How We Roll, for a video and more details.

Hennebery Eddy has a history of successful transportation architecture and transit design projects, ranging from the award-winning South Terminus to a dramatic expansion at Portland International Airport.

Restore Oregon’s DeMuro Award Honors Strand Ag Hall as a Top Restoration Project in Oregon

OSU Strand Ag Hall historic restoration architecture

Restore Oregon, a non-profit dedicated to preserving Oregon’s historic resources, announced the winners of its 2016 DeMuro Awards for historic restoration architecture, which included Hennebery Eddy’s Strand Agriculture Hall at Oregon State University. Named for the late developer Art DeMuro, the DeMuro Awards honor historic rehabilitation projects throughout the state of Oregon that demonstrate “exceptional quality, creativity and community impact from the restoration and reuse of historic properties.”

Read More.