Firm Promotes Sustainable, Equitable Design Through ‘Net-Positive Awards’

Hennebery Eddy’s second-annual Net-Positive Awards capped a month-long celebration of all things sustainability and honored internal teams for their achievements in healthy, efficient, and adaptive design. Project teams in design and construction were encouraged to share the story of how their designs are creating net-positive solutions responsive to clients, users, and the environment. A panel of five judges from among our staff had their work cut out for them. Ultimately, they selected the following projects, which represent the range of net-positive impacts achievable through our design process.

Rendered image by Hennebery Eddy Architects of PDX Terminal Balancing & Concourse E Extension, viewed from Airport Way

First Place: Net-Positive Project of the Year – PDX Concourse E Extension

This project (which garnered an honorable mention in last year’s awards program) is targeting completion next summer — and when complete, will offer a remarkable new passenger experience informed by resiliency, equity, and biophilia. The unique, column-free space with high, canted ceilings and a sweeping curtain wall will feature abundant daylight (lighting loads reduced 70%) and views of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. Durable, sustainably sourced, and locally produced materials are also designed to equitably serve a broad population. The project is on track for LEED Gold certification — no small feat for a facility that essentially operates 24/7.

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fire station design Hennebery Eddy Archtitects

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 Receives F.I.E.R.O. Award

Clackamas Fire District Station 16 received an Honor Design Award from the Fire Industry Education Resource Organization (F.I.E.R.O.) during the organization’s annual conference in Raleigh, North Carolina. The new fire station is one of two designed for the district by Hennebery Eddy that opened in the spring.

Hennebery Eddy project architect Camilla Cok, AIA, attended the F.I.E.R.O. conference to present “Equity, Efficiency, and Exceeding Expectations” with Clackamas Fire Deputy Chief Ryan Hari and Division Chief Josh Gehrke. The session provided an overview of the fire district’s goals of maximizing flexibility and efficiency to best serve the community, while creating a more equitable work environment. Camilla, Chief Hari, and Chief Gehrke shared Hennebery Eddy’s tailored, listening-first approach to designing Station 16. The collaborative effort resulted in an energy-efficient building with gender-neutral, space-saving bunk rooms; multi-use common spaces; optimized proximity between living quarters and the apparatus bay; and design features that acknowledge the historic significance of Oregon City and will also fit, reflect, and engage the community for the next 50 years.

Fire Station 16 is one of several award-winning fire station design projects from Hennebery Eddy. Other fire station projects include Clackamas Fire District Station 19, City of Portland Fire Station 28, and Fire Station 76 for Multnomah County Rural Fire Protection District 10.

Bend Science Station Receives Merit Award from AIA Northwest + Pacific Region

academic laboratory design Bend Science Station Hennebery Eddy Architects

A small building with a big impact was recognized with a regional design award by the AIA Northwest and Pacific Region. Bend Science Station Learning Laboratories, designed by Hennebery Eddy Architects, received a Merit award during Thursday’s regional award ceremony in Bozeman, Montana. The new 3,750-square-foot building is a light-flooded learning laboratory on the Oregon State University-Cascades (OSU) campus that provides access to state-of-the-art facilities for STEM education, research, and teacher training serving K-12 students and teachers of Central Oregon.

The Science Station fits the broader context of the high desert region and the immediate context of the new OSU-Cascades campus in form, materiality, and intent. A metal shell protects the warm, cedar-clad interior and covered outdoor spaces, and the building’s design fuses experiential learning and architecture, seen in the demonstration tower, outdoor classroom, and visible sustainable design features. Enrolled in the Path to Net Zero program through the Energy Trust of Oregon, Bend Science Station is one of the first buildings of its type in Central Oregon designed to achieve net-zero energy. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and native landscaping minimize on-site water use.

Additional project details and images can be found on the Bend Science Station project page in our Portfolio.

Principal in charge and Hennebery Eddy president Tim Eddy, FAIA, accepted the award with project manager and associate Dan Petrescu, AIA, and interior designer and associate Ashley Nored, NCIDQ. Tim also served as a member of the regional firm award jury following the AIA NW+PR’s recognition of Hennebery Eddy with the 2018 AIA Northwest & Pacific Region Firm Award. Congratulations to the 2019 Firm Award winner, Weinstein A+U, and to all of the design award recipients!

 

COTE Top Ten for Students Internship Focuses on Net-Positive Design

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern has shared their internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. This month, Philippe Bernard, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and graduate of Laval University, reflects on his time with the firm. Read previous posts by interns Haley here and Jordan here.

AIA COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard
COTE Top Ten for Students intern Philippe Bernard (left) meets with fellow staff members for input on their latest design.

This internship opportunity came at a pivotal moment in my development as a future architect. As a student, I participated in the AIA COTE Top Ten for Students 2019 contest, and our team was the first Canadian contestant to win this international competition! It was excellent news, considering that I was also completing my master’s degree at Laval University in Quebec City. It is thanks to this sustainable design competition that I was put in contact with Hennebery Eddy, an architectural firm also very committed to eco-friendly design. This is a very rewarding experience for me, given the important language adaptation that I have to demonstrate as a French-speaking Canadian. French is my mother tongue, so immersion in an English-speaking country and workplace is very instructive.

Prior to this internship in Portland, I had the chance to complete other work experience in various architectural firms in Quebec. The corporate scale of Hennebery Eddy is very interesting, combining the advantages of a large firm and the welcoming side of a smaller office. It is a firm with significant resources given its size of 65 employees, which offers a stimulating work environment. I really appreciate the attention of all the Hennebery Eddy staff in listening to my questions and comments. Everyone is treated equally, creating a very democratic and pleasant working environment.

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Haley Teske design intern

Architecture Internship Provides New Perspective for Design Student

By Haley Teske, Design Intern

This summer, Hennebery Eddy has the pleasure of hosting three design interns. In a three-part series throughout the summer, each intern will share their architecture internship experience and takeaways from their time with the firm. First, Haley Teske, a COTE Top Ten for Students winner and student at Montana State University, reflects on her experience so far. Read the other posts in this series, by Jordan here and Philippe here

My initial exposure to Hennebery Eddy began during my undergraduate experience at Montana State University. President Tim Eddy and Associate Dawn Carlton, both alumni of MSU, have been frequenting our school as active advisory council members for some years now and are highly regarded by the faculty.

Through studio critiques and my involvement with AIAS (American Institute of Architecture Students), I was quickly acquainted with both individuals and found them memorable due to a tangible authenticity. Fast-forward to graduate school, I stubbornly decided that I must work in Portland after deeming it one of the best design cities in the states. Hennebery Eddy immediately came to mind. Dawn was generous enough to give me a tour of the office, and I found the firm extremely appealing. Each design projected a distinct character to its history, site, and use as opposed to the ego of an architect. Rarely does a firm display attention to the needs of a project on such an apparent scale. If this firm listened so well to its clients, then it must listen as closely to the needs of its employees.

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What I Learned from the Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship

Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray
Hennebery Eddy Architects Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray, left, works with design staff member Pooja Kashyap to capture project data for the DDx.

In 2019, Hennebery Eddy received a Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship grant from Energy Trust of Oregon to hire a sustainable design student intern to help us comply with our Architecture 2030 Commitment, integrate new sustainable design QC checks throughout our design process, and conduct post-occupancy evaluations focused on building performance. The internship demonstrates our dedication to the 2030 pledge and our broader net-positive philosophy and integrated sustainable design process. In the second post of a two-part series, intern Madelaine Murray shares her what she learned from her time at Hennebery Eddy. Read her first post here.

Purpose

The primary role of Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern for Hennebery Eddy is to help our sustainability committee report the firm’s 2018 projects performance metrics, using AIA’s Architecture 2030 Commitment tool called Design Data Exchange (DDx).

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Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern: Introducing Madelaine

Net Zero Emerging Leaders Intern Madelaine Murray working at Hennebery Eddy Architects. The NZEL internship is funded from a grant from Energy Trust of Oregon.
Net Zero Emerging Leaders intern Madelaine Murray consults with design staff and sustainability committee member Pooja Kashyap.

In 2019, Hennebery Eddy received a Net Zero Emerging Leaders Internship grant from Energy Trust of Oregon to hire a sustainable design student intern to help us comply with our Architecture 2030 Commitment, integrate new sustainable design QC checks throughout our design process, and conduct post-occupancy evaluations focused on building performance. The internship demonstrates our dedication to the 2030 pledge and our broader net-positive philosophy and integrated sustainable design process. In the first of a series of blog posts, intern Madelaine Murray shares her initial reflections from the experience.

I’m Madelaine Murray, a graduate student in the College of Design at the University of Oregon – Portland. One of the advantages to studying in Portland is the ability to work at an architecture firm alongside classes, especially in a city acting as a hub for sustainable culture and mindful design. Hennebery Eddy is a very familiar name at the UO Portland, advocating for net-positive design, and several staff members have served as visiting reviewers for student projects. Hennebery Eddy is certainly a role model for successful projects rooted in context and for utilizing design principles relating to sustainability and thinking long term. University of Oregon encourages students to think beyond the buzzword of “sustainability,” allowing students to focus on many different avenues of design, such as adaptive reuse, resiliency, and energy efficiency. What was enticing about becoming a Net Zero Emerging Leader is advocating for these concepts beyond the academic realm. Reading about a building’s energy use in a textbook is not nearly as impactful as discussing it with a project team aiming reach a specific EUI goal. In a way, the NZEL program lets aspiring architects like me watch these sustainable design principles come to life.

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Lessons Learned: A week in the life of a Carleton College extern

By Karen Chen, Carlton College extern

Each year, the firm hosts an “extern” from Carleton College. These are undergraduate students who may be interested in pursuing design studies and architect careers, and their 1-2 weeks here are designed to give them a taste of every aspect of our profession. Our most recent extern, Karen Chen, shares reflections from her November externship. Her post has been slightly edited for brevity.

Karen Chen, right, with her externship homestay host at Portland’s Tilikum Crossing bridge.

I had the privilege and pleasure of being dipped into the professional sphere of architecture for a week at Hennebery Eddy Architects. During the externship application process, I was attracted to Hennebery Eddy’s demonstrated core values of innovative design, responsive service, and the obligation that firm members take ownership in their work. They aligned with my developing interests in art, STEM, and environmental and social justice — what would be more complementary than a discipline that uses considerations in aesthetics and physical function to create structures for people to inhabit in the real world?

I was exposed to an eye-opening, informative slice of the architectural industry and what professional life entailed. I gleaned a ton of knowledge and insight about architect careers simply through watching and talking with architects in various roles. Through shadowing, observing meetings, and conversations, I have a firmer handle on topics like entrance into the field, schooling, school-to-career transitions, internships, and career and job development. I both sat in on meetings about projects and accompanied architects who had volunteered to take me to tours of those project sites, including the Clackamas County fire stations, the new PDX terminal, a commercial renovation at Columbia Square, a factory cafeteria, and community college buildings.

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